Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Active ]
[ Login ]
Log-in to remove these advertisements.

Standards of living in Libya under Gaddafi

POST REPLY
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 65
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 13 Aug 2011, 23:52
Ideology: Other
Pioneer
Post 17 Jun 2012, 02:36
Quote:
When analysing the standard of living in Libya it is important to put the achievements into context. During the 1950’s under the leadership of King Idris, Libya was amongst the poorest nations in the world with some of the lowest living standards. From the early 1980’s until 2003 Libya were placed under heavy sanctions by the US and UN which had the result of strangling Libya’s growing economy leading to an inevitable smothering of development projects and social welfare schemes. Despite this The Libyan Arab Jamahiriya achieved the highest living standard in Africa. Libya has also invested heavily in African development initiatives. The funding of infrastructure projects as well as African political and financial institutions was aimed at developing Africa independently and combating the economic exploitation of African resources and labour by outside powers. On January 4th, 2011 – just weeks before the conflict in Libya started -UN members praised Libya’s continued welfare provision and commitment to upholding human rights.


Full article here http://globalciviliansforpeace.com/2011 ... -in-libya/

I read somewhere that Libya was considered the "Cuba of North Africa", in that compared to the rest of the developing world both nations had exceptionally high standards of living and health care as well as being extremely anti-imperialist and often working directly to help the third world.

So really why is there even a debate around Gaddafi amongst comrades? He may not have been an orthodox Marxist or a Marxist at all but Morales and Chavez aren't either and all three have seen extremely positive results from their socialist systems.
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 17 Jun 2012, 03:23
Libya had a much higher standard of living than Cuba. The concessions Libyan people got were actually amazing. Free housing, subsidies for cars, food and so on.
Although Gadafi was by no means an "anti-imperialist", he actively cooperated with , most notably, French and Italian imperialism , financed all kinds of militias in Africa and invaded Chad.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 200
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jul 2011, 11:37
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 17 Jun 2012, 13:08
Classless wrote:
So really why is there even a debate around Gaddafi amongst comrades? He may not have been an orthodox Marxist or a Marxist at all but Morales and Chavez aren't either and all three have seen extremely positive results from their socialist systems.


Because he is the current day defeated bogeyman for most people in the "free world". And Western moviemakers are rude enough to make movies like "Dictator" that parody a guy who was killed by being stabbed in his intestines.
Soviet cogitations: 7
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 17 Jun 2012, 14:38
New Comrade (Say hi & be nice to me!)
Post 17 Jun 2012, 18:55
''Although Gadafi was by no means an "anti-imperialist", he actively cooperated with , most notably, French and Italian imperialism , financed all kinds of militias in Africa and invaded Chad.''

Gaddafi rejected communism and there's no doubt that Libya under Gaddafi was fraught with contradictions however to suggest that Gaddafi was 'by no means an anti-imperialist' is a little simplistic and ignores the varying arab nationalist, socialist and pan-African characteristics of Libya since the 1969 al-Fatah Revolution.

Gaddafi was inspired by Gamel Nasser's Arab nationalism and in 1969 at the age of 27 launched a military coup with fellow army officers against the Libyan neo-colonial monarchy which was installed by the US and British to oversee their economic and military interests in Libya. Gaddafi immediately dismantled the the US Wheelus base which was the largest US base outside of America and expelled British troops stationed in Libya.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcxFMGd-D5o

He then went on to nationalise the economy and rapidly increased the standard of living of Libyans despite crippling sanctions being imposed by the US and the UN on Libya. Libyans had access to free healthcare, education, housing and subsidised utilities and fuel. They went from one of the poorest nations on earth to by far the most developed country in Africa within a few decades.

The Libyan Arab Jamahiriya were the main financiers of the ANC in south Africa providing them with funding and arms during the anti-apartheid struggle. When Nelson Mandela was freed, within days he broke the sanctions on Libya to visit Gaddafi who he described as a great friend and later as 'one of the greatest revolutionaries of the 20th century'. Nelson Mandela also has a grandson named after Gaddafi.

Libya funded other liberation struggles such as the PLO in Palestine, the Sandinistas in Nicaragua and the IRA in the North of Ireland.

'Gaddafi ended his political life as a dedicated pan-Africanist and, whatever one thought of the man, it is clear that his vision for African was very different from that of the subordinate supplier of cheap labour and raw materials that Africom was created to maintain. He was not only the driving force behind the creation of the African Union in 2002, but had also served as its elected head, and made Libya its biggest financial donor. To the dismay of some of his African colleagues, he used his time as leader to push for a "United States of Africa", with a single currency, single army and single passport. More concretely, Gaddafi's Libya had an estimated $150bn worth of investment in Africa – often in social infrastructure and development projects, and this largesse bought him many friends, particularly in the smaller nations. As long as Gaddafi retained this level of influence in Africa, Africom was going to founder.'

Gaddafi refused the US military initiative AFRICOM to station a military base on African soil. Libya bribed countries to refuse US offers. AFRICOM is now well on its way to being established and active on African soil.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... marches-on

Libya's fatal mistake was naively making concession with the west in the 2000's which began the liberalisation of their economy and clearly gave imperialism a foot in Libya. These concessions were made in exchange for the lifting of crippling sanctions on the Libyan economy but also in light of the devastation unleashed on Iraq. However despite these concession Libya were not a pliant client state of imperialism. Libya had recently made foreign oil firms agree to a much lower share of crude oil production (50% down to 27%); it had refused to sign the US military charter for Africa; no foreign firm could undertake business in Libya without at least a 35% share owned by a Libyan individual or company; plans were underway to introduce the gold dinar (single currency for Africa); it continued to lead the international campaign for reparations for slavery and colonialism; and numerous other unambiguously anti-imperialist measures of recent years. Western oil firms were on the verge of pulling out of Libya before the 2011 war.

Whilst Gaddafi and Libya were riddled with contradictions they were attacked precisely because they have been a thorn in the side of imperialism for decades.
Soviet cogitations: 236
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2012, 03:04
Ideology: None
Pioneer
Post 19 Jul 2012, 13:43
Didn't he have a 100 year contract with the Central African Republic where they alone would have exclusive rights to their mineral resources? That's what I call Imperialism...
Alternative Display:
Mobile view
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.