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Czechoslovakia

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Soviet cogitations: 3711
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2006, 04:49
Ideology: Juche
Old Bolshevik
Post 13 Jun 2007, 06:23
I have a question, is there any information on Czechoslovakia during to Communist Era? Also, I'm wondering if there is a movement to reunite Czechoslovakia.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 19 Sep 2005, 13:48
Embalmed
Post 26 Jun 2007, 19:24
Definitely try Country Studies. If you do Google search for it and then while on the C.Studies site click Czechslovakia. Very very interesting.

I don't think there's any attemps to reunite the Czech Republic and Slovakia at the moment.
Now what is this…
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Soviet cogitations: 50
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Dec 2007, 06:38
Pioneer
Post 03 Dec 2007, 09:14
maybe the kommunist party of Czech republics can answer this:

www.kscm.cz and the komsomol www.ksm.cz Actually the communists are still in parlement, but they face high discrimination and there are violent attacks against socialists in Czech, I do not feel very save there to be honest.
Soviet cogitations: 2775
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 27 Sep 2004, 23:23
Party Bureaucrat
Post 03 Dec 2007, 23:21
Anyone have anything to say about the Prague Spring?
Whoppee for Comrade Sergei.
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Soviet cogitations: 4501
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 04 Dec 2007, 21:09
Only that Gorbachev called his reforms twenty years later a continuation of Dubcek's (this sentiment alone in my mind acting as partial justification for the intervention).
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
Soviet cogitations: 2775
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 27 Sep 2004, 23:23
Party Bureaucrat
Post 04 Dec 2007, 22:32
I don't think trading with the west was one of the parts of the reform, it was only supposed to be internal reform of how the government was run and organized. True, it may have been too great of a reform and have opened the government to capitalist-roaders. But by this time the USSR was not proceeding with socialism, and so a deviation from this path might have been beneficial. Also, I read that the repression of this reform led to the disillusionment of many European communists, who ceased to support Marxist-Leninist policies. Perhaps allowing these reforms might have been more beneficial, in the long run.
Whoppee for Comrade Sergei.
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Soviet cogitations: 4501
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 04 Dec 2007, 23:42
Quote:
I don't think trading with the west was one of the parts of the reform, it was only supposed to be internal reform of how the government was run and organized. True, it may have been too great of a reform and have opened the government to capitalist-roaders. But by this time the USSR was not proceeding with socialism, and so a deviation from this path might have been beneficial. Also, I read that the repression of this reform led to the disillusionment of many European communists, who ceased to support Marxist-Leninist policies. Perhaps allowing these reforms might have been more beneficial, in the long run.


Well I suppose that how one looks at this depends on whether they consider the USSR at this time to have been socialist. I for one maintain that it was until 1987 and 1988 with the laws on state enterprise and on cooperatives, and the 1990 destruction of Communist Party monopoly on political power.

It is true that many European communists turned to an anti-Soviet 'eurocommunism' after this action. However I doubt that nonintervention could have been beneficial in the long run, both for ideological and practical reasons. Ideologically, the success of reforms would have at the minimum meant the end of Marxist-Leninist outlook in politics (ie through the introduction of party competition). A worst case scenario would see the victory of counterrevolutionary elements seeking to completely destroy socialism and separate the country from the socialist bloc. Practically: minimally, it would have resulted in similar agitation in other socialist bloc nations. Maximally, it would mean similar revolts demanding an end to socialism.

As history has played out, it has been shown that minor political and economic concessions have led only to continually widening demands to the point where the new systems could no longer be described even as social democratic, much less Marxist-Leninist. There already had existed a period in the mid to late 1940s where Eastern Europe was granted relative political autonomy in exchange for non-alignment. With the imposition of socialism after that time, there could be no 'going back' so to speak, lest the region break away from the east and integrate with the west (as has been witnessed since the collapse of socialism).
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
Soviet cogitations: 2775
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 27 Sep 2004, 23:23
Party Bureaucrat
Post 05 Dec 2007, 00:13
Yes, I suppose.

I think that If Dubcek were more successful at reigning in the Prague Spring, it may have had a more positive outcome.

Wikipedia wrote:
The programme initially called for greater participation of the people in local and country politics under the umbrella of the Communist Party, for greater freedom of the press and of culture, and emphasised the need for personal initiative in economics. The most loathed representatives of the previous style of rule were left to go.

The programme did not envisage the existence of independent political parties or private ownership of companies. Participation in Eastern Bloc structures was not questioned. The events of the Prague Spring, especially their speed and escalation, outstripped the original programme, to the surprise and dismay of its authors.


I can see the benefits of the first set of policies, but the next set are similar to gorbachev's reforms.
Whoppee for Comrade Sergei.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2006, 04:49
Ideology: Juche
Old Bolshevik
Post 26 Oct 2008, 00:01
I'm sorry to resurrect a 1.5 year old thread, but I just found a site of a party that calls itself "The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia". Does anyone know how to translate this? I'm curious about their platform, and if they want Czechoslovak Reunification.

Link
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 17 Jul 2006, 00:10
Ideology: Other Leftist
Forum Commissar
Post 26 Oct 2008, 00:12
i cant speak this language too good, but it looks like they dont support it, but dont take my word for granted, they support national identity so i guess they are mostly czech party.

they seem to support pyongyang decleration, but i have no idea what that it
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Soviet cogitations: 3553
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 17 Jul 2006, 00:10
Ideology: Other Leftist
Forum Commissar
Post 15 Jul 2009, 22:40
sorry for necroposting, but it's relevant to the discussion.

i found out from someone who moved to slovakia several interesting facts.
it seems that there were ethnic frictions between czechs and slovaks already before czechoslovakia was formed. i dont have much background information about these frictions, but there were obvious misunderstandings between the nations during the first CS republic (if i remember correctly slovak language was outlawed). during the world war when germans and hungarians invaded slovakia, czechs in slovak army rather surrendered to the invading armies than fight for slovaks.
this ethnic misunderstanding seems to continue until today it seems. czechs apparently believe slovaks are backwardly and lazy, but to tell the truth i find both nations intolerant. but hey, if they would be tolerant there wouldnt be any need for a split either.
Image


Jugoslavija je bleda slika
premrzlega partizana
zato je njeno ljudstvo navajeno trpeti
zato je njeno ljudstvo pripravljeno umreti.

-Via Ofenziva

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Soviet cogitations: 272
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Mar 2008, 02:58
Komsomol
Post 29 Jul 2009, 17:34
You should check out the book The Czechs and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown.
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