Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Active ]
[ Login ]
Log-in to remove these advertisements.

Footage of Kim Jong-un

POST REPLY
Soviet cogitations: 12389
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Apr 2010, 04:44
Ideology: None
Philosophized
Post 01 Oct 2010, 02:12
In what other country could my Aunt become a General?

Seems Kim is packing the military with relatives and trusted loyalists, and that "Juche" really boils down to "keep it in the family".
Miss Strangelove: "You feed giants laxatives so goblins can mine their poop before the gnomes get to it."
Soviet cogitations: 1093
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Mar 2008, 22:11
Party Member
Post 01 Oct 2010, 04:47
Yep. So if anyone was thinking of a coup (or someone else getting political power from the ground up) the "right people" would be there to stop it. Kim Jong-Il is doing everything he needs to. I wonder with the son rising in political power so fast if in the next two-five yrs the son will become the new leader and Kim Jong-Il will retire for his health. He looked pretty healthy, but of course people can always put up a "brave front" for the public of course. It's just interesting how fast he's rising and how now he's more in the NK public media more.
Image
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 105
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 08 Dec 2005, 10:40
Pioneer
Post 01 Oct 2010, 22:57
But who else could you trust to defend the country against revisionism? Another leader might choose to follow the traitorous "chinese model" and we all know where that leads.

Comrades, I would expect to read such scurrilous lies about the Brilliant Comrade (that he got his position only because he was Kim Jong-Il's son and other such nonsense
) in the capitalist press, but to read it on our own forums and papers is depressing. It reminds me of the hurtful comments people make about me because I spend most of my time arguing with people I just invented
. In summary, we must rally to defend the DPRK against imperialist encirclement and distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is strong!
Image
Soviet cogitations: 5437
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 28 Sep 2009, 00:56
Ideology: Democratic Socialism
Unperson
Post 01 Oct 2010, 23:53
Oh lol. He looks a far cry from the Kim Jong Un of Homefront.

Please let him become leader. His portlyness will be the ultimate irony. Shame though

had my hopes up for this guy

Image
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4779
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 12 May 2010, 07:43
Ideology: Other Leftist
Politburo
Post 02 Oct 2010, 00:28
Jingle_Bombs wrote:
Oh lol. He looks a far cry from the Kim Jong Un of Homefront.

LOL I know! When I saw the footage and pictures with Kim Jong Un, I was so damn disappointed. Damn you, video games, for giving me unrealistic expectations!

Which one is that guy in the picture?
“Conservatism is the blind and fear-filled worship of dead radicals” - Mark Twain
Soviet cogitations: 1093
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Mar 2008, 22:11
Party Member
Post 02 Oct 2010, 01:15
Quote:
Ah yes, gods forbid the PEOPLE taking charge of the country right?


Lol. I love how you assume I support such a thing. You do notice the quotes around the word right, right?
Image
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4953
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 13 Feb 2008, 15:25
Ideology: Other Leftist
Politburo
Post 02 Oct 2010, 03:05
I will be genuinely disappointed if Kim Jong Un does become the new leader. This is the chance the DPRK has to disprove a lot of the rumours about it.
Soviet cogitations: 1093
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Mar 2008, 22:11
Party Member
Post 02 Oct 2010, 04:39
Well I'm sure the new leader is probably already decided and rumors aren't going to change it either way.
Image
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 1782
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2009, 20:08
Resident Artist
Post 02 Oct 2010, 10:12
The DPRK should abandon that silly Juche ideology and construct a superior ideology because it has outlived its usefulness. It isn't as wealthy as it once was and it's high time that they change before the state implodes, causing turmoil on the northern border with China. Autarky is a backwards system which thwarts economic development and causes shortages in essential goods, and the sooner they abandon it, the better it is for the people.

Let us congratulate King Jong-un for succeeding his father as chairman.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 3711
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2006, 04:49
Ideology: Juche
Old Bolshevik
Post 02 Oct 2010, 10:37
Quote:
Autarky is a backwards system which thwarts economic development and causes shortages in essential goods, and the sooner they abandon it, the better it is for the people.


North Korea is not isolationist and it is not autarkic. For example, one can see Czechoslovak trams in Pyongyang (In addition to native Korean production), German trains in the Metro, and Air Koryo's entire inventory consists of Soviet jets. There is no reason to believe that this would have ended if the Soviet Union had not fallen. The ultimate problem lies in the fact that most businesses in the West refuse to do service with the DPRK and the fact that Chinese and Russian businesses demand hard currency before doing business, and North Korea, like most Socialist countries, does not have very much hard currency.

Quote:
Let us congratulate King Jong-un for succeeding his father as chairman.


There is no proof that he will. He merely got promoted to a high rank, it does not guarantee that he will succeed Kim Jong Il.
Soviet cogitations: 57
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 16 Aug 2010, 14:35
Pioneer
Post 03 Oct 2010, 15:44
Tails:

It could be remarked that on a global scale Juche philosophy of self-determination and self-sufficiency is the only philosophy that "works" ... since there is as of yet not much interplanterary trade going on.

Further, the Juche does not preclude that there is no trade with other countries, just that it does not want to be totally dependend on it.

As of current the DPRK is actively promoting doing business with western firms to acquire hard currency.
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 105
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 08 Dec 2005, 10:40
Pioneer
Post 03 Oct 2010, 20:47
Though Canuck was clearly taking the piss with this topic, I think his appearance is an extremely important political issue. When he takes over (accept it) his strong physical resemblance to the young Kim Il Sung will surely enhance his legitimacy. The mao suit and the hair help a lot with this and he's just as portly as the Great Leader was. Perhaps this is the intention.
Image
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 3711
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2006, 04:49
Ideology: Juche
Old Bolshevik
Post 04 Oct 2010, 02:12
Quote:
As of current the DPRK is actively promoting doing business with western firms to acquire hard currency.


Interesting. I had assumed that the number of Western businesses that would deal with North Korea would be very few. Do you know where I can read more?
Soviet cogitations: 46
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jun 2008, 11:26
Pioneer
Post 10 Oct 2010, 10:09
This is semi-rhetorical, but I would welcome a response by someone who believes in the DPRK...

If North Korea is a people's republic, a democracy, or however you would describe a free society, why is it we're seeing yet another addition to the Kim dynasty? My "rhetorical" question isn't about Fidel to Raul or Bush Sr to Bush Jr, what I mean is, what possible justification on the side of democracy or socialism is there to explain why the leaders of North Korea are nepotists?

Take Sweden or Switzerland. Not perfect societies, but certainly more stable and more democratic than most nations on earth. We do not see the rotating chairman of Switzerland's government appointing family members to positions of authority to protect his/her hold on power, nor have we seen the same with modern Sweden.

I suppose my question is serious, but I haven't actually seen a justification attempted for this specific question. Like I said, I'm not talking about the dynastic transfer itself, I'm saying if someone believes the DPRK is a democratic society, how are these actions appropriate?
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 90
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Sep 2010, 22:24
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 10 Oct 2010, 12:43
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11509166

BBC reporters were given unprecedented access to the huge parade in central Pyongyang today to mark the 65th anniversary of the Worker's Party. Upon the VIP stand, sat with Kim Jong-il? None other than Kim Jong-un. It's a rare occasion that foreign news agencies are allowed to come into North Korea to cover an event live, and it does have me wondering why now? Is the DPRK wishing to show it's stability over this "transitional" period?
Image
Soviet cogitations: 10005
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 14 Jul 2008, 20:01
Ideology: Trotskyism
Philosophized
Post 10 Oct 2010, 12:51
What about George Bush and his daddy? What about the fact that, for decades, Greece has been ruled by the Karamanlis-Papandreou clan?

Also, we don't know anything at all. We still can't know for sure what the matter is with Kim Jong-un, all we have are wild, wild speculations by western media that are trying to brainwash us. I've stopped following the matter, really. Trying to follow internal DPRK politics is like trying to observe the dark side of the moon with a telescope. Frustrating and impossible.
"Don't know why i'm still surprised with this shit anyway." - Loz
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 90
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Sep 2010, 22:24
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 10 Oct 2010, 13:02
Mabool wrote:
Trying to follow internal DPRK politics is like trying to observe the dark side of the moon with a telescope. Frustrating and impossible.


It's annoying though. I'd quite like to know what's happening in the DPRK. I find it one of the more interesting countries in the world. Even the DPRK's Korean Central News Agency doesn't tell you too much.
Image
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 554
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 28 Aug 2007, 05:36
Komsomol
Post 10 Oct 2010, 18:54
Quote:
What about George Bush and his daddy? What about the fact that, for decades, Greece has been ruled by the Karamanlis-Papandreou clan?


This argument boils down to "Some countries do x, therefore it's okay for North Korea to do x."
The answer is no, it isn't right when it happens in Greece, it isn't right when it happens in the United States, and it isn't right when it happens in North Korea. Just because it happens in another country around the world doesn't mean that action is justifiable and "ok". Because contrary to popular belief, the United States/Greece are not shining examples of working Socialist nations which you can draw parallels from.

North Korea should be held to the same standard as everyone else;they don't get a golden ticket which exempts them from criticism just because they claim to be Socialist.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4764
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 20 Jul 2007, 06:59
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Forum Commissar
Post 12 Oct 2010, 00:26
Photogallery of the Anniversary

I think it's pretty clear that this is a succession.
Image

"You say you have no enemies? How is this so? Have you never spoken the truth, never loved justice?" - Santiago Ramón y Cajal
Forum Rules
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 90
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Sep 2010, 22:24
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 12 Oct 2010, 00:34
I don't want to appear as "Sizeist" or whatever, but I really do wish someone would suggest that Kim Jong-un lose some weight. From my understanding, the Chinese did something similar to the late Kim Il-sung when he became a bit bigger...suggesting it wasn't very "Communistic" to look like you are on a much better diet than the rest of the people. If the DPRK is insistent on making this a Dynasty, can we at least have a leader who looks like they are of Worker's stock...
Image
Alternative Display:
Mobile view
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.