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Nicolae Ceauşescu

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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Nov 2010, 07:17
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Post 02 Dec 2010, 01:37
Quote from Wikipedia:

Quote:
Nicolae Ceauşescu (26 January 1918 – 25 December 1989) was a Romanian politician who was the Secretary General of the Romanian Communist Party from 1965 to 1989, President of the Council of State from 1967, and President of Romania from 1974 to 1989.

His rule was marked in the first decade by an open policy towards Western Europe, Israel, and the United States, which deviated from that of the other Warsaw Pact states during the Cold War. He continued a trend first established by his predecessor, Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej, who had tactfully coaxed the Soviet Union into withdrawing its troops from Romania in 1958.

Ceauşescu's second decade was characterized by an increasingly erratic personality cult, nationalism and a deterioration in foreign relations with the Western powers as well as the Soviet Union. Ceauşescu's government was overthrown in a December 1989 revolution, and he and his wife were executed following a televised and hastily organised two-hour court session. One of the executioners later said: "it wasn’t a trial, it was a political assassination in the middle of a revolution."


I recently decided to broaden my knowledge of the former Eastern Bloc beyond the DDR and USSR, and I picked Romania to start. Nicolae Ceauşescu was the last leader of the Socialist Republic of Romania, to me he sounds like a guy who lost touch with his people and paid for it with his life. What is the general opinion among communists of Ceauşescu and the "Romanian Communist Party?" From what I've read it seems he adopted more of a Maoist agenda as his rule continued, how does this sit with modern communists? In other words, does he have a legacy or a following?
Whenever death may surprise us, let it be welcome if our battle cry has reached even one receptive ear and another hand reaches out to take up our arms.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 13 Feb 2008, 15:25
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Politburo
Post 02 Dec 2010, 02:06
In the 1980's Ceauşescu approached the then premier of my state with a trade proposition. Much of the rolling stock on our railways at the time had been built in the 1930's and badly needed replacement. Lazy and corrupt governments had failed to deliver. The Romanians offered to build us new rolling stock and I think even new locomotives in exchange for coal. Of course the offer was rejected as the government of the time was right wing to the point of being Fascist. That's really all I know about Romania in that era.
Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 02 Dec 2010, 02:09
Ceausescu was a degenerate and an incompetent nepotist.
In addition to that,he had serious psychological issues:from megalomania to unbelievable paranoia and egoism.
Last edited by Loz on 02 Dec 2010, 10:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 27 Apr 2007, 18:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 02 Dec 2010, 09:46
Ceauşescu was also so completely alienated from reality, that when he heard angry mobs shouting his name, he thought "his people" were calling for him. Not to mention his inhuman policy on abortion and that dreadful wife of his who pretended to be some chemical researcher, even though she never finished elementary school and her thesis was in all probability written by someone else. Romania under the Ceauşescus was one of the worst "Communist" countries along with Democratic Kampuchea and Albania.
Last edited by Comrade Kaiwen on 03 Dec 2010, 18:47, edited 1 time in total.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Nov 2010, 07:17
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Post 03 Dec 2010, 06:54
You know the more I read about the leaders of Romania, Bulgaria, and Albania....the rest of the Comm Bloc leaders do not look that bad afterall compared to those leaders.
Whenever death may surprise us, let it be welcome if our battle cry has reached even one receptive ear and another hand reaches out to take up our arms.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Mar 2010, 01:20
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Post 03 Dec 2010, 07:03
I don't know a great deal about Bulgaria (I was under the impression that it wasn't quite as bad as those others.), but as far as the other two go you'll probably get a fair amount of agreement on that assessment.
As far as Ceauşescu is concerned I think Loz hit the nail on the head with his comment
Loz wrote:
Ceausescu was a degenerate and an incompetent nepotist.
In addition to that,he had serious psychological issues:from megalomania to unbelievable paranoia and egoism.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Nov 2010, 07:17
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Post 03 Dec 2010, 14:49
Well the issue I see with Bulgaria is Zhivkov's policies towards Bulgarians of ethnic Turkish background living in Bulgaria. I cannot approve of outlawing the Turkish language, forcing them to adopt Bulgarian names, while forcing many to leave the country.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?f ... CID+bg0184)
Whenever death may surprise us, let it be welcome if our battle cry has reached even one receptive ear and another hand reaches out to take up our arms.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 14 Jan 2010, 05:46
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Party Member
Post 03 Dec 2010, 19:22
Things were better in Romania under Ceausescu then they are now.
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"Those who do not move, do not notice their chains." - Rosa Luxemburg
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RIP Muamar Qadafi
RIP Hugo Chavez
Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 03 Dec 2010, 22:29
Quote:
Things were better in Romania under Ceausescu then they are now.

Depends.
Romania-style socialism had serious flaws,but i'd agree that it was still up on the rising 'till mid-70s.But,at the same time terrible aberrations appeared,and got worse over time.
After that,economy started failing,and Ceausescu gradually started loosing what little credibility he still had.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Apr 2010, 04:44
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Philosophized
Post 03 Dec 2010, 22:45
I don't think there's going to be any serious "rehabilitation" for Ceausescu. He seems to be the Romanian peoples' pick for Most Unpopular Head Of State since the days of Vlad Tepes.

Georgi Dimitrov of Bulgaria gets major respect from me for standing up to the Nazis during the Reichstag fire frame-up, and beating them.
Miss Strangelove: "You feed giants laxatives so goblins can mine their poop before the gnomes get to it."
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Dec 2010, 08:23
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 04:00
Red Brigade wrote:
Things were better in Romania under Ceausescu then they are now.



I believe I have to agree with this, and I can't allow myself to support the reactionary counterrevolution of 1989 that dismantled the Romanian Worker's State. As for Zhivkov, his assimilation policies were necessary to unite and solidify the state. In order for the revolution to maintain itself, people have to be united by something.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Mar 2010, 01:20
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 05:36
Order227 wrote:
Georgi Dimitrov of Bulgaria gets major respect from me for standing up to the Nazis during the Reichstag fire frame-up, and beating them.
Bulgarian conduct during the war was considerably better than almost all the countries in the region. While they passed various race laws (under directions from Germany) they didn't enforce them in the zealous way that most of their neighbours did - none of the Jews (of Bulgarian nationality) were deported into Nazi hands. Demonstrating the fallaciousness of the claim (made in other countries) that co-operation with the German dictatorship was the only option for those states which came under the heel of Nazism.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 11 Oct 2008, 06:42
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 09:20
So we can talk thoroughly about a nutjob as Pol Pot here on the forums, some even trying to find "the good side", yet we throw easily Conservapedia.com like 2 liners about a socialist leader from a major country in Eastern Europe.

Granted, isnt like the guy started some important movement inside socialism, but there are still lot of intersting things about him, some of them written even here on the forum.
Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 12:44
Quote:
As for Zhivkov, his assimilation policies were necessary to unite and solidify the state. In order for the revolution to maintain itself, people have to be united by something.

Absurd.
These are extremely nationalist policies,not socialist-internationalist ones.
How come the Soviet Union didn't have a need to assimilate it's peoples "in order to unite and solidify the state?
Peoples are united by socialism,not assimilation.

Quote:
Demonstrating the fallaciousness of the claim (made in other countries) that co-operation with the German dictatorship was the only option for those states which came under the heel of Nazism.

But Bulgaria did cooperate with Nazi Germany,it's just that they didn't prosecute Jews so ardently.
On the other hand,that's also true for fascist Italy.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 17 Jul 2006, 00:10
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 13:13
Quote:
On the other hand,that's also true for fascist Italy.


fascist party had a jewish newspaper for its jewish members coming out each month for a while. when they started to align with germany they disbanded newspapers and agencies for jews and when salo republic came to be they started openly persecuting jews. that doesnt means they didnt had "summer" camps set up for others long before they started these persecutions.
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Jugoslavija je bleda slika
premrzlega partizana
zato je njeno ljudstvo navajeno trpeti
zato je njeno ljudstvo pripravljeno umreti.

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Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 13:16
Quote:
when they started to align with germany they disbanded newspapers and agencies for jews and when salo republic came to be they started openly persecuting jews.

Yes but Salo republic was a nazi Germany puppet state,and "old"(before 1943) fascist Italy was something else.

Quote:
that doesnt means they didnt had "summer" camps set up for others long before they started these persecutions.

Of course,i didn't mean it that way.
But what you said is probably also true for Jews in Bulgaria.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 17 Jul 2006, 00:10
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Forum Commissar
Post 04 Dec 2010, 13:29
Quote:
Yes but Salo republic was a nazi Germany puppet state,and "old"(before 1943) fascist Italy was something else.


what i wanted to say is that they already started these kind of persecutions when they started to align with germany which was in 1938 if my memory serves me correct. when they established salo they went with all speed ahead to holocaust.
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Jugoslavija je bleda slika
premrzlega partizana
zato je njeno ljudstvo navajeno trpeti
zato je njeno ljudstvo pripravljeno umreti.

-Via Ofenziva

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Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 04 Dec 2010, 14:03
Ok then.
I didn't know that.
I always thought that pre-'43 fascist Italy didn't prosecute Jews.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Apr 2010, 04:44
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Philosophized
Post 05 Dec 2010, 03:34
Mussolini, despite being a fascist scumbag, wasn't really keen on Jewish persecution before the war. After his arrest and rescue by Skorzeny, he was essentially Gauleiter of Northern Italy and had no choice but to enforce Nazi racial laws.
Miss Strangelove: "You feed giants laxatives so goblins can mine their poop before the gnomes get to it."
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Mar 2010, 01:20
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Forum Commissar
Post 05 Dec 2010, 07:46
Loz wrote:
But Bulgaria did cooperate with Nazi Germany,it's just that they didn't prosecute Jews so ardently.
Alright Loz. You're splitting hairs here. I said what they did do and what they didn't do - I was just trying to point out that going along with the Holocaust was a choice which certain states made and certain states didn't make.
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