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Mao and the Taiping Tien' kuo

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Soviet cogitations: 68
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Sep 2011, 20:03
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 19 Jan 2012, 20:55
What did Mao think of this movement from the 19th century?

I have only read Franz Michael's book on the subject. Failed examinee Hong Xiuquan (sp) believed he was the younger brother of Jesus Christ. He convinced others from his Hakka community and formed a group that preached and recruited others, including miners, pirates and other secret society types.

From the start the movement was not simply against the Manchu regime, as other movements had been, but was against the Confucian social order itself. Hong and his followers formed an army that defeated the Green Standard troops but had trouble with some provincial self-defense forces raised by local governors. Eventually, they captured Nanjing, which became the Taiping capital until its fall in 1864.

The movement based its social structure on the famous Chou-li system. Equality was enforced with all Taipings being formed into battailions for both economic and military efforts. The sexes were initially segregated for discipline, even husbands and wives. Both men and women fought in formation. Pigtails were banned. Taipings studied the scriptures, as interpreted by Hong and his entourage. There was also a land law which divided the land equally, though making adjustments for soil quality to groups of 25 families, each headed by a sergeant.

Eventually military defeat, cut-through political struggles and some foreign intervention spelled the doom of the Taipings, though Michael points out that the largest reason for their defeat was the defense of the Confucian social order by many Chinese. By default the Manchu's got a temporary breather.

Estimates of dead include 20 million dead, placing the conflict on the same destructive scale as the two world wars. A professor of
I saw said it was the most bizarre event in Chinese history. I personally enjoy Hong's commentary on the scriptures.

At any rate - thank you for reading.
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Soviet cogitations: 14444
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2006, 22:05
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 26 Jan 2012, 22:06
Is there any available translation of Hong's interpretation of scripture? I've always been interested by east Asian views on Abrahamic religions.
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Soviet cogitations: 68
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Sep 2011, 20:03
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 31 Jan 2012, 15:13
Franz Michael's history has two associated volumes of translated documents of both the Taipings and the Manchus. There are translations of Hong's commentary in both the old and new testament.
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Soviet cogitations: 989
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 05 Jul 2004, 01:47
Komsomol
Post 03 Mar 2012, 19:48
The Taiping Kingdom is of particular interest to me. I have read some (English-language) PRC books from the Cultural Revolution on the subject, they were largely positive towards it (so I presume Mao was as well). Taiping was seen as a sort of precursor to the later revolutions in China, including the Communist one.
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 68
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Sep 2011, 20:03
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 02 Apr 2012, 20:31
Suryong wrote:
The Taiping Kingdom is of particular interest to me. I have read some (English-language) PRC books from the Cultural Revolution on the subject, they were largely positive towards it (so I presume Mao was as well). Taiping was seen as a sort of precursor to the later revolutions in China, including the Communist one.



That is interesting. Is there a particular text which gives the official PRC view of the Taiping Tien-Kuo?
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