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"The State and Social Structure of the U.S.S.R." (1952, PDF)

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Soviet cogitations: 673
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Mar 2011, 14:10
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 17 Jan 2015, 14:05
https://archive.org/details/TheSocialAn ... eOfTheUSSR

I just scanned it. It's basically a 240-page explanation of how the Stalin Constitution operates in practice and an elaboration/clarification of its articles.

Table of contents:
Quote:
CHAPTER I
SOVIET SOCIALIST SOCIETY
Socialism in the Everyday Life of the People
Socialist Property
Two Forms of Socialist Property
Socialist, Planned Economy
The Superiority of Socialist, Planned Economy Over Capitalist Economy
Work in Soviet Socialist Economy
The Moral and Political Unity of Soviet Society

CHAPTER II
THE SOVIET SOCIALIST STATE
The Soviets
The Soviet Republic
The Primary and Fundamental Basis of the Soviet State
Guidance of Soviet Society by the State
The Superiority of the Soviet State Over the Capitalist State

CHAPTER III
THE STATE STRUCTURE OF THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS
The Status of the Peoples Composing the Soviet Union
What Is the Soviet Union?
What Is a Union Republic?
What Is an Autonomous Republic?
What Is an Auotonomous Region?
What Is a National Area?
The Friendship of the Soviet People Is Indestructible

CHAPTER IV
THE HIGHER ORGANS OF STATE POWER AND OF STATE ADMINISTRATION OF THE U.S.S.R.
How the Organs of State Power Are Formed in Our Country
Those Whom the People Have Entrusted with Supreme Power in the Country
The Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R.
The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R.
The Council of Ministers of the U.S.S.R.

CHAPTER V
THE COURTS AND THE PROCURATOR'S OFFICE
The Old Landlord-Bourgeois Courts
The Soviet Courts and Their Functions
Soviet Judicial Organs
Genuine People's Courts
The Soviet Procurator's Office

CHAPTER VI
THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF SOVIET CITIZENS
Citizens of the Soviet Union
The Right to Work
The Right to Rest and Leisure
The Right to Material Security
The Right to Education
The Equality of Men and Women
The Equality of Citizens of All Nationalites and Races
Freedom of Conscience
Political Liberties

CHAPTER VII
THE FUNDAMENTAL DUTIES OF SOVIET CITIZENS
On Rights and Duties
To Abide by the Stalin Constitution, to Observe the Soviet Laws
To Maintain Labour Discipline
Honestly to Perform Public Duties
To Respect the Rules of Socialist Intercourse
To Safeguard and Fortify Public, Socialist Property
An Honourable Duty of Soviet Citizens
The Sacred Duty of Every Soviet Citizen

cHAPTER VIII
THE LEADING AND DIRECTING FORCE OF THE SOVIET UNION


As for the author, from the 1970s Great Soviet Encyclopedia:
Quote:
Karpińskii, Viacheslav Alekseevich

Born Jan. 16, 1880, in Penza; died Mar. 20, 1965, in Moscow. Figure in the revolutionary movement in Russia, publicist, doctor of economics. Hero of Socialist Labor (1962). Became a member of the Communist Party in 1898. The son of a government official.

Karpińskii was expelled from the University of Kharkov for revolutionary activity. He helped organize the Union of Struggle for the Emancipation of the Working Class in Kharkov in late 1902. Persecuted by the authorities, he emigrated in 1904 to Geneva. Under V. I. Lenin’s direction, he worked for the newspapers Vpered and Proletarii and contributed to Pravda. In World War I (1914–18) he set up the publication of the newspaper Sotsial-demokrat and carried out a number of Lenin’s assignments. Returning to Russia in 1917, Karpińskii worked for the newspaper Derevenskaia pravda and directed the agitation and instruction department of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee. During the Civil War of 1918–20, Karpińskii edited the newspaper Krasnaia zvezda, which was published on the propaganda steamship of the same name; he became the editor of the newspaper Bednota in 1918. A member of the editorial board of Pravda and of the editorial boards of several newspapers and magazines from 1918 to 1927, Karpińskii in 1936–37 worked in the apparatus of the Central Committee of the ACP (Bolshevik). After 1937 he was engaged in scholarly and literary propaganda work.

Karpińskii was a delegate to the Eighth, Sixteenth, and Twenty-second Congresses of the party and was elected a member of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee. Lenin wrote more than 100 letters to Karpińskii. Karpińskii was the author of books, pamphlets, and articles on Lenin and on the history of the Communist Party and the Soviet state. He was awarded three Orders of Lenin.
Karpinsky, like Elena Stasova, Grigory Petrovsky, Gleb Krzhizhanovsky and some other "Old Bolsheviks," played a role in condemning "Stalinism" and getting various persons rehabilitated after 1956, so this is another case of someone extolling Stalin because it was what you did back in the day. It's still a pretty good book though.
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 17 Jan 2015, 14:33
Quote:
CHAPTER VI
THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF SOVIET CITIZENS
Citizens of the Soviet Union
The Right to Work
The Right to Rest and Leisure
The Right to Material Security
The Right to Education
The Equality of Men and Women
The Equality of Citizens of All Nationalites and Races
Freedom of Conscience
Political Liberties

Good joke. Stalin's "most democratic constitution in the world" wasn't worth the paper it was written on because it didn't apply in reality.
Soviet cogitations: 673
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Mar 2011, 14:10
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 17 Jan 2015, 14:55
It seems a bit odd to complain that Stalin was too friendly to religion and then claim that freedom of conscience didn't exist under him.

Also I don't see how having a section on political liberties is a "joke." Obviously it isn't a liberal definition.
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