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How did you go about getting a job in USSR?

POST REPLY
Soviet cogitations: 14
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 05 Nov 2012, 02:56
Unperson
Post 12 Nov 2012, 18:51
I understand you were guaranteed work in the USSR, but how exactly did you go about doing this? Could you just walk into any place with no experience, and say "I want to work here," and then they'd have to train you from scratch? If Person A was skilled in a particular field of work, would they have a better chance than Person B that walked in with no experience for this certain job? Or would this be considered illegal?

Do you get placed in a job yourself by the govt, or are you free to choose wherever you go?

This is all mostly under assumption that this particular person didn't go to a university nor obtain any degree of any kind.
Soviet cogitations: 236
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2012, 03:04
Ideology: None
Pioneer
Post 30 Nov 2012, 18:36
People picked jobs on their own accords, not by the government. If someone needed work, they could have gone to a relevant government institution that could help them find work, but that was really their only option. It is true that everyone had to be employed in the Soviet Union, but it was the individual's duty to find work. If you didn't find work, there was no way to feed yourself otherwise.

As of 1946, there were only 15 million government workers in the USSR. The Labor Unions had 25 million members as of the 1930s. Those are still very large numbers, but nothing in comparison to the whole population.

In 1926, roughly 70% of the Soviet population was Peasant. That number went down to 46.6% as of the 1940s.
Soviet cogitations: 14
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 05 Nov 2012, 02:56
Unperson
Post 12 Dec 2012, 18:37
Interesting. I remember reading a quote in an article by Stalin in Pravda that said "Those who don't work, don't eat" which if I remember correctly is from the bible.
Soviet cogitations: 236
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2012, 03:04
Ideology: None
Pioneer
Post 12 Dec 2012, 18:59
"The basis of the relations of production under the socialist system, which so far has been established only in the U.S.S.R., is the social ownership of the means of production. Here there are no longer exploiters and exploited. The goods produced are distributed according to labor performed, on the principle: 'He who does not work, neither shall he eat.' Here the mutual relations of people in the process of production are marked by comradely cooperation and the socialist mutual assistance of workers who are free from exploitation. Here the relations of production fully correspond to the state of productive forces; for the social character of the process of production is reinforced by the social ownership of the means of production."
-Stalin, Dialectical and Historical Materialism
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/stalin/works/1938/09.htm

Quote:
which if I remember correctly is from the bible.

Yes it is, but it also ties into the Socialist value of "From each according to their abilities, to each according to their work."

Or from the 1936 Soviet Constitution:
ARTICLE 12. In the U.S.S.R. work is a duty and a matter of honor for every able-bodied citizen, in accordance with the principle: "He who does not work, neither shall he eat."
The principle applied in the U.S.S.R. is that of socialism: "From each according to his ability, to each according to his work."
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 10
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Dec 2012, 04:28
New Comrade (Say hi & be nice to me!)
Post 15 Dec 2012, 07:00
Getting a job seemed to be fairly simple. The government was willing to help, to a certain extent, individuals find a job.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 716
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 04 Aug 2007, 23:25
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 12 Jan 2013, 14:58
MrInkGuy wrote:
I understand you were guaranteed work in the USSR, but how exactly did you go about doing this? Could you just walk into any place with no experience, and say "I want to work here," and then they'd have to train you from scratch? If Person A was skilled in a particular field of work, would they have a better chance than Person B that walked in with no experience for this certain job? Or would this be considered illegal?


Well, of course you needed to be qualified for a job, there were still requirements that needed to be met in order to be employed in specific sectors.
Image

"Communism is more about love for mankind than about politics."
Me
Soviet cogitations: 14
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 20 Jan 2013, 13:38
Unperson
Post 24 Jan 2013, 01:25
I was a spoiled diplomat of the Philippine embassy in Moscow. I get 2000 roubles a month plus the freebies I got from my friends high up there. I don't go home to Philippines without at least 3-4 boxes of Russian vodka which I share with colonels and captains in the Armed Forces of the Philippines. I was also a high ranking member of Philippine Communist Party-Moscow oriented. If I wanted diamonds for my concubine, I can easily get them through my friend, Anatoly Gromyko.
_M_
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 6
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2012, 18:29
Ideology: Other
New Comrade (Say hi & be nice to me!)
Post 22 Feb 2013, 18:04
'He who does not work, neither shall he eat.'

For those who can work that seems fair, but what about those who were unable to work because of handicaps, mental diseases etc.? Were they provided some kind of government assistantance to live?
"Life is like a piano what you get out of it depends on how you play it." - Tom Lehere
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 22 Feb 2013, 18:47
That's the principle in socialism.
Those who couldn't work were of course provided with some sort of assistance. Invalids' pensions and so on weren't that great.
Soviet cogitations: 2051
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Jun 2011, 08:37
Party Bureaucrat
Post 23 Feb 2013, 05:47
"From each according to ability". Someone with a physical disability could do other types of work for example.
Soviet America is Free America!

Under communism, there is no freedom; you are not free to live in poverty, be homeless, to be without an education, to starve, or to be without a job
Soviet cogitations: 236
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2012, 03:04
Ideology: None
Pioneer
Post 23 Feb 2013, 17:41
_M_ wrote:
'He who does not work, neither shall he eat.'

For those who can work that seems fair, but what about those who were unable to work because of handicaps, mental diseases etc.? Were they provided some kind of government assistantance to live?


"There are three great cooperative organizations [in the Soviet Union]. One is the all-Russian Union of Invalids. This is an association of handicraft workers who have been disables in war. Invalid bookbinders join together to practice their craft. Disabled metal workers do likewise. All share in the profits. This organization has lower dues than other cooperatives, and the government has given it an advantage in reduced taxes."- Davis, Jerome.Behind Soviet Power. P.62.
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