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The Stalin School Of Falsification

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Soviet cogitations: 83
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jan 2012, 22:09
Pioneer
Post 22 Feb 2012, 20:13
"All practical work in connection with the organization of the uprising was done under the immediate direction of Comrade Trotsky, the president of the Petrograd Soviet. It can be stated with certainty that the Party is indebted primarily and principally to Comrade Trotsky for the rapid going over of the garrison to the side of the Soviet and the efficient manner in which the work of the Military-Revolutionary Committee was organized. The principal assistants of Comrade Trotsky were Comrades Antonov and Podvoisky."
Stalin, 1917

whatever happened to this? It just vanished from Stalin's book like magic.
Loz
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Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 22 Feb 2012, 20:33
I've already mentioned that MIA quotes Molotov on how the editors chose to remove it and that the paragraph was present in Stalin's original.
What else have you got?
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Soviet cogitations: 14444
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2006, 22:05
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 22 Feb 2012, 21:01
Stalin also kept Trotsky's works to read while officially banning his writings throughout the USSR. More than anything that's my biggest beef with Stalin. If Trotsky was such a poor Marxist then it should be easy to destroy him in civil debate rather than with pick-axes being embeded in people's brains.
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Soviet cogitations: 83
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jan 2012, 22:09
Pioneer
Post 22 Feb 2012, 21:22
Loz wrote:
I've already mentioned that MIA quotes Molotov on how the editors chose to remove it and that the paragraph was present in Stalin's original.
What else have you got?


Are you saying it's not important, that Stalin had this removed? This article says in no uncertain terms that Trotsky led the revolution. In fact this didn't happen overnight, it was a process Trotsky guided over several weeks.

This was removed because it didn't fit with the lies told about Trotsky. Trotsky was branded a counter-revolutionary and it was inconvenient to have this paragraph when Trotsky's followers were all being killed.

What else?

“I have to say that comrade Trotsky played no particular role in the October insurrection and could not do so; that, being chairman of the Petrograd Soviet, he merely fulfilled the will of the corresponding party authority which guided his every step.”

And further:

Comrade Trotsky played no particular role in the party or the October insurrection and could not do so, being a man comparatively new to our party in the October period.” (J. Stalin: Trotskyism or Leninism, pp.68f.)

Dagoth Ur wrote:
Stalin also kept Trotsky's works to read while officially banning his writings throughout the USSR. More than anything that's my biggest beef with Stalin. If Trotsky was such a poor Marxist then it should be easy to destroy him in civil debate rather than with pick-axes being embeded in people's brains.


Also there is the murder of Trotsksy children, grandchildren, ten thousand followers, their children and so on .
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Soviet cogitations: 14444
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2006, 22:05
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 22 Feb 2012, 21:27
And a billion other people too right? Where'd you pull that 10,000 figure from? Because it smells like shit.
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Soviet cogitations: 83
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jan 2012, 22:09
Pioneer
Post 22 Feb 2012, 21:45
Quote:
Immortal and heroic resistance of Trotskyists

There are many informative and illuminating chapters in this book, too numerous to relate here. But the heroic role of the Marxists, particularly the Trotskyists in the camps, is tremendous. The incidents that Rogovin deals with are quite well known from earlier scattered fragments, including the (successful) hunger strike and uprising in Vorkuta in 1937. Sketched out here is the immortal and heroic resistance of what were at one time 10,000 Trotskyists who shouted their defiance of Stalin and their support for Trotsky and the Fourth International in the frozen tundra. Their hunger strike in March 1937 ended in complete victory. From this, they were treated as political prisoners, with all their demands met. But this only set the scene for brutal reprisals, carried out in the strictest secrecy. One thousand two hundred Trotskyists were gathered in a brick factory, 20 kilometres from the Vorkuta mine. The executions were carried out by one Kashketin, an NKVD officer suffering from “schizoid psychoneurosis”. The order for the executions was personally signed by Stalin.

Some of those, like Poznansky, a former secretary of Trotsky, were tortured with particular savagery during their interrogation. This was followed by group shootings with almost daily tens of prisoners sent into the tundra. According to Rogovin, “they shot not only the Trotskyists themselves, but any members of their families who were with them”. He goes on: “When a husband was shot, his imprisoned wife was automatically sent to be shot; with the most significant oppositionists, their children who had reached the age of 12 were also subject to shooting.” One such operation lasted ten hours. This mass slaughter of the “bravest of the brave”, taken together with the mass purges, played a crucial role in breaking the knot of history, of throwing back the ‘memory’ of the working class. No significant group was then left in Soviet society capable of challenging Stalin on a clear programme of workers’ democracy.


History
Stalin’s Terror of 1937-1938

27/11/2009

Political Genocide in the USSR - Review of new book by Russian historian Vadim Z. Rogovin (Mehring Books)

http://www.socialistworld.net/doc/3794

Depends what you call Trots. Something like a million were expelled from the CP and many ended up dead, most maybe. Quite hard to get overall numbers.

I think 400,000 were expelled just in 1934.

Not that the above paste is just talking about a couple of incidents.

"Rogovin comments: “Altogether, more communists from Eastern European countries were killed in the Soviet Union than died at home in their own countries during Hitler’s occupation.”"


Now, check this:

Arrival at Vorkuta

Quote:
In addition to these genuine Trotskyists, there were in the camps of Vorkuta and elsewhere more than 100,000 prisoners who, members of the party and the youth, had adhered to the Trotskyist Opposition and then at different times and for diverse reasons (of which the principal were evidently repressions, unemployment, persecutions, exclusion from schools and university facilities, etc) were forced to “recant their errors” and withdraw from the Opposition.


http://www.marxist.com/trotskyists-stal ... orkuta.htm

The Trotskyists in Stalin's concentration camps - An eyewitness account of the strike at Vorkuta

"One time, a group of nearly a hundred, composed mainly of Trotskyists, was led away to be shot. As they marched away, the condemned sang the “Internationale,” joined by the voices of hundreds of prisoners remaining in camp."

"At the time of execution of a male prisoner, his imprisoned wife was automatically liable to capital punishment; and when it was a question of well-known members of the Opposition, this applied equally to any of his children over the age of twelve.

In May, when hardly a hundred prisoners remained, the executions were interrupted. Two weeks passed quietly; then all the prisoners were led in a convoy to the mine."
Last edited by daft punk on 22 Feb 2012, 21:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Soviet cogitations: 14444
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2006, 22:05
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 22 Feb 2012, 21:54
I get the impression it was more like "Trotskyist" was being used as a justification for executions rather than indicative of whether they supported permanent revoultion. Still what source is the author using? Because he's just saying it like you did.
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Soviet cogitations: 83
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jan 2012, 22:09
Pioneer
Post 22 Feb 2012, 22:07
source for which bit? The first lot is a review of Rogovin's last book and the second lot was something that appeared in a socialist parer in 1961, signed MP, and by the sound of it about the only person who survived that camp. It goes into a lot of detail so it sounds genuine. But there are loads of sources on the purges, Trepper, Orlov and so on. They were both NVKD, Orlov defected to avoid exectution (Stalin was killing most of the NKVD who had smashed the Spanish revolution for him, to keep the quiet) and Trepper was a Soviet spy in WW2. His boss was killed for mentioning how many communists were being slaughtered. Trepper was probably safer as a spy in Nazi occupied territories! (death rate about 70%)

I doubt every oppositionist was aware of Permanent Revolution, the opposition was about a lot more than theory.
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