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What was the membership process for joining CPSU?

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Soviet cogitations: 564
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jun 2010, 16:09
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 20 Jan 2012, 01:26
I know party members are already involved when they're pioneers, and work their way up to the party but what if someone is older and wants to join? Let's say a 20 year old? or 30 year old? What do you have to do?
Партия всегда права.
Die Partei hat immer recht.
The Party is always right.
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Soviet cogitations: 200
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jul 2011, 11:37
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 29 Jan 2012, 13:49
My grandpa joined the KSC (Communist Party of Czechoslovakia) when he was 21. Don't know about the CPSU through.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 564
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jun 2010, 16:09
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 29 Jan 2012, 20:36
Wow tell me about how he did it and such. That sounds really interesting. What was the process?
Партия всегда права.
Die Partei hat immer recht.
The Party is always right.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4405
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 29 Jan 2012, 21:57
English language document on the 'Rules of the CPSU', adopted by the 22nd Congress of the CPSU in 1961. There were marginal amendments made at further Congresses, but this document pretty much spells out the process. Not too burdensome a document to read, so long as you skip the jargon.

http://www.politicsresources.net/docs/comrule.htm
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 200
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jul 2011, 11:37
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 30 Jan 2012, 20:14
Man In Grey wrote:
Wow tell me about how he did it and such. That sounds really interesting. What was the process?


Honestly, I don't know much except for when he joined it (he joined it in 1957 and he was 21 at that time). I know that 10-20 percent of people were communist party members in 1989 and that the number was higher before the 1968 invasion. Pretty much everybody thus has at least someone from his family, maybe close, maybe extended who was a KSC member (in fact, ironically, most 15 year old tard right wing communism haters have KSC member parents) Every child was a pioneer, so it is not like the Young Pioneers movement was some sort of communist party recruiting ground.

The communist party was not some elite cabal, and most of the members were just higher positioned workers. My grandfather worked in a chemical factory and worked with corrosive, ridiculously dangerous chemicals, for example (nitric acid mostly, as the factory mostly produced fertilizer).
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4405
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 30 Jan 2012, 21:54
Neuron wrote:
The communist party was not some elite cabal, and most of the members were just higher positioned workers. My grandfather worked in a chemical factory and worked with corrosive, ridiculously dangerous chemicals, for example (nitric acid mostly, as the factory mostly produced fertilizer).


Excellent point. The same was true of one of my grandparents and an uncle. I think the 'party member = perks or privileges' is another one of those myths that belongs in the stupidest arguments against communism' thread. Lots of people, many reasonably educated, really think that all party members automatically lived better by virtue of their membership. In fact I'd say that for the ordinary member it could be somewhat of a chore -having to attend meetings, pay dues, pay close attention to the news to explain the party's position to others, etc. To clarify, membership did not mean access to special stores, better housing, cars, etc. Those were for certain categories of workers and top levels of the government. It could help one to attain certain types of employment, and it did carry a level of prestige and importance when making one's position known, but other than that there wasn't much to be gained from a purely self-interested perspective.
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
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