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Is there anything Soviet made still in space?

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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 19 Sep 2005, 13:48
Embalmed
Post 16 Dec 2009, 16:32
Excuse my naivety on the subject. I don't really know anything about satelites, etc.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 26 Jun 2006, 15:59
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Post 16 Dec 2009, 21:16
Several satellites from the 1980s.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 13 Feb 2008, 15:25
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Post 16 Dec 2009, 22:48
There's a lot of Soviet stuff still in space to my knowledge. Some satellites are still in use by the Russian Federation. while others have been neglected and allowed to become space junk.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 12 Jun 2006, 02:14
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Post 16 Dec 2009, 23:33
The GLONASS positioning system was started during soviet times. Its satellites are still there.


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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2006, 04:49
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Post 17 Dec 2009, 05:50
Don't forget the numerous probes sent out by the USSR to the Moon and Venus, like the Lunakhod.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Feb 2004, 06:15
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Post 01 Dec 2011, 02:51
The ones in Venus got destroyed pretty soon, though. The place is truly hellish.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Nov 2011, 06:40
Komsomol
Post 01 Dec 2011, 16:29
Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the International Space Station has some Soviet made parts. Also, I'm not sure if the Buran was ever decommissioned...
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Feb 2004, 06:15
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Post 01 Dec 2011, 17:27
I doubt that very much, considering that the idea was conceived a couple of years sfter the ussr ceased to exist
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Nov 2011, 06:40
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Post 01 Dec 2011, 18:42
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internatio ... .27s_Mir-2

Quote:
Russia's Mir-2
Main articles: Mir-2, Salyut, Almaz, and Mir
The Russian Buran Space shuttle would have carried modules up to 30tons to MIR-2. 80-100 ton modules would have used its launcher without the shuttle

The Russian Orbital Segment (ROS or RS) is the eleventh Soviet-Russian space station. Mir and the ISS are successors to the Salyut and Almaz stations. Mir-2 was originally authorized in the February 1976 resolution setting forth plans for development of third generation Soviet space systems. The first MIR-2 module was launched in 1986 by an Energia heavy-lift expendable launch system. The launcher worked properly, however the Polyus payload fired its engines to insert itself into orbit whilst in the wrong position due to a programming error, and re-entered the atmosphere. The planned station changed several times, but Zvezda was always the service module. The station would have used the Buran space shuttle and Proton rockets to lift new modules into orbit. The spaceframe of Zvezda, also called DOS-8 serial number 128, was completed in February 1985 and major internal equipment was installed by October 1986. [62]

The Polyus module or spacecraft, which would have served the same function as Zarya, looked like a "Salyut" slightly modified for this task and was made up from parts of the ships "Cosmos-929, -1267, -1443, -1668" and from modules of MIR-2 station. There are two different descriptions of the weapon systems. In one, Polyus is described as a space-borne nuclear bomber, in another it is described as a satellite interceptor, carrying a 1 MegaWatt carbon dioxide laser. The module had a length of almost 37 m and a diameter of 4.1 m weighed nearly 80 t and included 2 principal sections, the smallest, the functional service block (FGB) and the largest, the aim module. [63]

In 1983, the design was changed and the station would consist of Zvezda, followed by several 90 metric ton modules and a truss structure similar to the current station. The draft was approved by NPO Energia Chief Semenov on 14 December 1987 and announced to the press as 'Mir-2' in January 1988. This station would be visited by the Russian Space Shuttle Buran, but mainly resupplied by Progress-M2 spacecraft. Orbital assembly of the station was expected to begin in 1993.[62] In 1993 with the collapse of the Soviet Union, a redesigned smaller Mir-2 was to be built whilst attached to Mir, just as OPSEK is being assembled whilst attached to the ISS.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Feb 2004, 06:15
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Post 01 Dec 2011, 18:55
Did you read the bit about when it was built?

Quote:
Zarya {the first module} was paid for by the United States space agency NASA and was built from December 1994 to January 1998 in Russia at the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center (KhSC) in Moscow.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Nov 2011, 06:40
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Post 01 Dec 2011, 19:18
Yes, got that. I'm a little bit amazed that this was post Soviet era. I remember it being part of the peace talks between the US and USSR in the mid 80's. (Maybe that was late 80's?) I think the NASA shuttles were designed with an international space station in mind. Interesting also that it was American money that paid for the Russian component.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 13 Feb 2008, 15:25
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Post 05 Dec 2011, 14:35
Krasniy_Volk wrote:
I doubt that very much, considering that the idea was conceived a couple of years sfter the ussr ceased to exist


Are you talking about the ISS? If so, this is wrong. The ISS started as an American space station which began planning during the 80's. Ya_Amerikanyets is correct insomuch as a lot of the basic technology which keeps the ISS in orbit was invented in the Soviet Union. This was because the Yanks were still having trouble developing equivalent hardware (such as a waste recycling system) even in the 1990's, which forced them to negotiate with Russia for access to their technology to be copied.

With the exception of the moon landings, the USSR was the undisputed king of manned space flight during the Cold War. It's pretty laughable that today, American astronauts now have to use Russian rockets developed 50 years ago to get replacement crews to the ISS.

Meanwhile, the Chinese are working on their own space station, also based in part off Soviet technology.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Feb 2004, 06:15
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Post 05 Dec 2011, 17:57
Did you read the links in this thread? It's pretty clear the building of the first module of the ISS began TWO years after the Soviet Union went down
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Jun 2011, 08:37
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Post 06 Dec 2011, 02:05
Krasniy_Volk wrote:
Did you read the links in this thread? It's pretty clear the building of the first module of the ISS began TWO years after the Soviet Union went down


well, the technology wouldnt have changed dramatically in two years though.

Any russian space tech in the mid 90s would still be soviet in origin.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Feb 2004, 06:15
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Post 06 Dec 2011, 02:56
Yeah, but I think that talking about tech origins is to walk a fine line, since scientific advances and technologies are usually not clean-cut - consider how much of the US space program was inspired by nazi rocketry, for instance, yet we don't attribute it to them beyond the fact that von Braun was in charge of both.

(I find the quip about von Braun "The man who aimed at the stars but hit London instead" hilarious, though)
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Mar 2010, 01:20
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Post 06 Dec 2011, 03:17
Krasniy_Volk wrote:
Yeah, but I think that talking about tech origins is to walk a fine line, since scientific advances and technologies are usually not clean-cut - consider how much of the US space program was inspired by nazi rocketry, for instance, yet we don't attribute it to them beyond the fact that von Braun was in charge of both.

You've got an excellent point there. How far back do we want to trace this stuff? Just because some of it links back to ideas developed during the Soviet era.
The invention of the rocket engine got the ball rolling, but it might be stretch to give Hero of Alexandria (or Vitruvius) credit for the stuff that's currently flying around up there.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Nov 2011, 06:40
Komsomol
Post 06 Dec 2011, 04:46
I tried to talk to a Russian friend about Soviet scientific advances once, and got told that all the advances made during the Soviet era were actually based on discoveries made in the Tsarist era!


Not that I totally agree with that, but I imagine in some areas (such as medicine) there may be some truth to that. I dunno, just speculation on my part, don't shoot me for saying it, komrades!
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 06 Dec 2011, 04:56
Quote:
I tried to talk to a Russian friend about Soviet scientific advances once, and got told that all the advances made during the Soviet era were actually based on discoveries made in the Tsarist era!

I don't know.Which ones? The nuclear power plant for example?

Quote:
Not that I totally agree with that, but I imagine in some areas (such as medicine) there may be some truth to that. I dunno, just speculation on my part, don't shoot me for saying it, komrades!

Pretty much all chemistry is based on Mendeleev's Periodic table which was indeed invented in Tzarist times...
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 18 Nov 2011, 06:40
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Post 06 Dec 2011, 05:02
Loz wrote:
I don't know.Which ones? The nuclear power plant for example?



I don't think stolen tech counts.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 06 Dec 2011, 05:05
So it was stolen tech,eh?
Source?
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