Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Active ]
[ Login ]
Log-in to remove these advertisements.

Happiness+Apartments

POST REPLY
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 33
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 Jul 2016, 17:21
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 29 Aug 2016, 07:56
Hello,

I have 2 questions, my first being: were people happy in the USSR? My guess is that they were happy before the 1980s but because of stagnation and such people were beginning to get unhappier through perestroika times. I think that people in the 1960s and 1970s were happy because the USSR achieved a lot and living standards were the best.

2. Were the Soviet apartment always so crowded? I heard that this was only during Stalin times, and later the government created a lot of new apartments. Were these apartments safe?
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 30 Aug 2016, 00:38
USSR never even managed to achieve its own official minimum living space standards which were very low to begin with, something like 10 m2 per person. A lot of Russians however still live in temporary buildings hurriedly built in the 60s that were supposed to last only 20 years or so.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khrushchyovka
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 33
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 Jul 2016, 17:21
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 30 Aug 2016, 12:32
Okay, but the living conditions got better in the 1960s and 1970s? And were the Soviet people happy in that time?
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 2507
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 May 2004, 21:17
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Party Bureaucrat
Post 30 Aug 2016, 18:24
These statistics should help shed light on whether or not people were happy in the USSR. People worked good hours, good jobs in good industries, and had a lot of the necessities provided for them. If that's what you need to make yourself happy, then kudos!

While the tables don't explicitly state a yes or no to your question, there really isn't a solid yes or no to that question. Happiness, or contentment, with one's surroundings and lifestyle is generally relative to the individual and whether or not they were born into it or integrated into it, as well as what exposure to opposite lifestyles they've had in their time. Someone, for instance, born in the USSR hearing nothing but the bad propaganda about the West, would only know his life to be the best he's had, and as such, would consider himself generally content or happy with his situation. This doesn't mean he'd be frolicking around showering his footsteps with rose petals, but if living in a small socialist apartment was all he had ever known, and desiring something bigger was always seen as bourgeois by the ruling party, then he'd most likely be fine with what he has.

However, after the collapse of the USSR and the gradual integration of Capitalism and consumer-culture into Russia and satellite states, the peoples' perspectives changed because they were being exposed to an entirely new system that focuses on hedonism and satisfaction through material gain and possession. Asking people about how their lives were in the USSR after they had been exposed to this new world, most would probably tell you they were miserable.

So I guess it depends on who you ask and how you look at the picture. There's no clear "yes" or "no," just like there's no clear "yes" or "no" on happiness in the 21st Century West because we have the liberty of exposure to other countries, cultures, political/economic systems which alters our perspectives on our current situations (along with having it shoved down our throats everyday that if we should faun over people who live in big fancy houses and covet such things for ourselves...but that's a rant for another day).
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 1277
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Sep 2011, 13:51
Party Member
Post 30 Aug 2016, 22:06
Loz wrote:
A lot of Russians however still live in temporary buildings hurriedly built in the 60s that were supposed to last only 20 years or so.
I've personally never heard of or seen "temporary" Khrushchyovkas but I was born in one, most of my family have now spent the majority of their lives living in one and I've on and off also spent several years living in a Khrushchyovka and never once did I experience any problems with the plumbing, heating or electrcity as opposed to the current post-soviet building I'm temporarily residing in whereby I've already gone through major problems with the water, electricity and elevator; all within the span of two months.

Sure the apartments in Khrushchyovkas are small but then again so are the majority of apartments in Japanese urban areas. I don't see them complaining.
Image


My laws shall act more pleasure than command,
And with my prick I'll govern all the land.
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 33
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 Jul 2016, 17:21
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 31 Aug 2016, 05:47
Very interesting comrades! Thanks!
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 33
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 Jul 2016, 17:21
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 31 Aug 2016, 06:03
Freiheits Kämpfer wrote:
These statistics should help shed light on whether or not people were happy in the USSR. People worked good hours, good jobs in good industries, and had a lot of the necessities provided for them. If that's what you need to make yourself happy, then kudos!

While the tables don't explicitly state a yes or no to your question, there really isn't a solid yes or no to that question. Happiness, or contentment, with one's surroundings and lifestyle is generally relative to the individual and whether or not they were born into it or integrated into it, as well as what exposure to opposite lifestyles they've had in their time. Someone, for instance, born in the USSR hearing nothing but the bad propaganda about the West, would only know his life to be the best he's had, and as such, would consider himself generally content or happy with his situation. This doesn't mean he'd be frolicking around showering his footsteps with rose petals, but if living in a small socialist apartment was all he had ever known, and desiring something bigger was always seen as bourgeois by the ruling party, then he'd most likely be fine with what he has.

However, after the collapse of the USSR and the gradual integration of Capitalism and consumer-culture into Russia and satellite states, the peoples' perspectives changed because they were being exposed to an entirely new system that focuses on hedonism and satisfaction through material gain and possession. Asking people about how their lives were in the USSR after they had been exposed to this new world, most would probably tell you they were miserable.

So I guess it depends on who you ask and how you look at the picture. There's no clear "yes" or "no," just like there's no clear "yes" or "no" on happiness in the 21st Century West because we have the liberty of exposure to other countries, cultures, political/economic systems which alters our perspectives on our current situations (along with having it shoved down our throats everyday that if we should faun over people who live in big fancy houses and covet such things for ourselves...but that's a rant for another day).


In those statistics (when I go to consumption per capita) I see that the average consumption per capita is quite alright as in size. Is it this big because of the Soviet communist party members who had access to more things? Or was that just the average consumption per capita of the "normal" population?
Soviet cogitations: 64
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 04 Jun 2015, 20:48
Pioneer
Post 03 Sep 2016, 22:02
USSR wrote:

In those statistics (when I go to consumption per capita) I see that the average consumption per capita is quite alright as in size. Is it this big because of the Soviet communist party members who had access to more things? Or was that just the average consumption per capita of the "normal" population?

It is the average lol. Of course some had more and some had less. You can only eat so much though. Food is not money.
[+-]
Soviet cogitations: 33
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 09 Jul 2016, 17:21
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Pioneer
Post 04 Sep 2016, 07:52
yes indeed. Thanks
Alternative Display:
Mobile view
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.
cron