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Reflecting on Conflict in Syria

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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 30 Jan 2013, 21:57
I have been living in Lebanon a few years ago and this isn't a country in which you feel unsecured. If you take into consideration that Lebanon used to be a part of Syria, and that this country is Syria's neighbour, the fact that there is still no civil war in Lebanon is almost a miracle. You really shouldn't be affraid to go back in Lebanon.
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Sep 2011, 13:51
Ideology: Democratic Socialism
Party Member
Post 31 Jan 2013, 14:58
OP-Bagration wrote:
I have been living in Lebanon a few years ago and this isn't a country in which you feel unsecured. If you take into consideration that Lebanon used to be a part of Syria, and that this country is Syria's neighbor, the fact that there is still no civil war in Lebanon is almost a miracle. You really shouldn't be afraid to go back in Lebanon.


Lebanese have already been through 15 years of civil war and that makes them very adept at correctly reacting to random shootings here and there without it escalating. Another reason small clashes don't erupt into bigger battles is because Hezbollah have a strong enough militia not to let such things happen in main cities like Beirut and Tyre. Nevertheless killings do take place in Tripoli quite often and my brother who studies in the north not far from Tripoli often finds himself sitting in his dorm room unable to leave because schools and universities get cancelled because of the fear of getting caught in the crossfire for students on the way to school. This is all in 2012 I mean. Lebanon is one of the smallest countries in the world and that makes it hard to maneuver around to avoid passing through dangerous places. The potential for escalation is there. Why is it do you think that more than twenty million Lebanese live outside Lebanon whereas only 4 million inside. There are more than 100 members in my Lebanese family from my fathers side and not a single one of them was able to find security or a job in Lebanon. Lebanese people living inside show no fear when you meet them because they have gotten used to it and because they have no choice; but in no way is Lebanon what you may call a secure country. Besides with Israel next door you never know when one of their fighter jets might attack. Here's a link to how many places they bombed in 2006 with one of their bombs blowing up a radio station around 10 kilometers from where my brother was playing basketball with his friends at the time.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Locations_bombed_Aug13_no_fact_box.jpg

He later described it as seeing a huge fireball and then pillar of smoke appear in the distance only to be followed a few seconds later by the loudest boom he had ever heard. His ears were ringing for days. You call that secure? They even bombed the airport just one day before I was to leave to Beirut from Kiev and so I stayed the entire summer here in Ukraine. Even so all that pales in comparison to whats going on in Syria now and it will get worse if the regime collapses not just for Syria but for the entire region.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 02 Feb 2013, 21:34
Yeqon, the first part of your essay only invokes the spirit of colonialist apologia, I'm sure you've heard how some European reactionaries apply the same trick to war-torn African countries.

Quote:
You talk of Syria as if it were some abstract idea in which you choose a workers revolution instead of siding with either the state or the terrorists. Marx said that revolution comes when the time is right according to the political and economical situation of the moment and that a communist must be pragmatic and able to play the political game when necessary.

That's exactly why I support the FSA.

Quote:
A workers revolution is no option now in Syria and we must be in full support of the regime

A democratic revolution is the first stage of a workers' revolution.

Quote:
lest we be overwhelmed by another religious run wacko state or at worst total civil war in which every religious group fights for themselves thus further destabilizing the entire region . You either are really misinformed of the Syrian dilemma or are yourself a supporter of Islamic fundamentalism just like that freak in your avatar.

If you follow my line on the forum, you will know I point out that religious groups are a minority, and the only significant one works outside the FSA. It was also recently reported that the FSA is resentful of religious groups. Still, even disregarding all this, you should at least be neutral, not "support the regime". Even ignoring the fact that it is putrid and reactionary, you should realise that the rise of religious groups is precisely the product of the regime. By suppressing secular demonstration and strikes, by bombarding entire districts, by unleashing its Shabiha thugs, the regime pretty much opened the gates for the growth of religious groups.

Quote:
Before this all started Syrian people had pride and dignity in their nation. They were the only bordering Arab country who never bowed down to the Zionist presence next door. They were a secular state where all lived peacefully side by side. You prefer them to become another Iraq, Libya, or even another Saudi Arabia? My Syrian Sunni friends who were in support of the demonstrations at the beginning of the uprisings themselves now tell me that it would have been better had the Arab Spring never happened at all. Since then things have gone from functioning Arab states to total chaos and in not a single country has the Arab spring improved things but only brought violence and bloodshed. So go ahead and support your fruitcake "Allah U Akbar" friends and we'll see how peacefully, democratically, and progressively they'll run the country if they win.

I don't care about "nations", nations must burn if we are to have progress and communism. I also don't care about secularism for its own sake when it is, in fact, a mask used by a sectarian oligarchy. I also don't see a way to resolve the gap between the religious proletariat and "secular" Arab bourgeoisie other than to let the Islamists play their game out and then go into the dustbin of history, just like what is happening to the Egyptian Ikhwan.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 21 Dec 2010, 21:39
Pioneer
Post 05 Feb 2013, 15:52
I've just read a very interesting interview with the Syrian vice-Minister of the Exterior, Faisal Mikdad, in the German magazine "Spiegel" (respectively in its online issue). As it is in German, I translated the most important parts, and I hope you will be forgiving for my mistakes.^^

Quote:
You've just come back from Iran and Russia. Has the Russian government offered exile to the Syrian President Bashar Assad?

Why should they? No one has ever talked about that. We will win. This question of exile is nothing but psychological warfare. President Assad stated that he is born here and will die here, whenever this is to happen.

But even your ally, Russian vice-Minister of the Exterior, Mr Bogdanov, recently said that the Syrian government is losing control over more and more territory. What gives you still hope?

We are optimistic and strong enough to stand this challenge, even in case of an attack of an alliance of western and Gulf states, who claim to speak up for freedom and democracy in Syria. Four months ago, Aleppo was one of the most safe cities in the world. So I congratulate the advocates of human rights and democracy to the destruction of the Umayyad Mosque, the historic Souq and the old town of Aleppo. However, we really appreciate the Russian stand.

(...)

Originally, this revolution was a people's uprising against a repressive state. Many people describe how they were arrested and beaten half-dead in the torture chambers of the regime after demonstrations.

Why don't you ask other Syrians about their opinion? These people do not represent the majority of the Syrians. It is noticeable that the president has mostly reacted to the demands of the demonstrators. Emergency law was suspended, there is a new constitution, the hegemony of the Baath Party was suspended, the founding of new parties has been allowed, a new parliament was elected, there are new laws concerning assemblies – but all of this has been completely ignored, none of this has been appreciated abroad. In the opposite – after Assad having introduced these laws, the escalation really started. What else do these so-called revolutionaries want?

Seemingly it was too less and came too late. People don't believe you anymore.

For the most part this uprising is organised and paid from abroad. The fighters receive billions of dollars from certain Gulf states, this is a global multibillion mercenary business. President Assad has heard the demands of the people, and he wants to reconcile with it, namely with all of them, as he declared in his speech of 6th January. If the armed fighting and its support from abroad was stopped, we would be able to design the country's future.

(...)

For a long time Syria had good relations with Turkey, and at least no bad relations with Saudi Arabia. Why are you so much enemies with these two countries now?

We had long tried to have good relations; however, we had to notice that the Muslim Brother Erdogan follows a totally different agenda, namely to bring back legally the Muslim Brothers back to Syria, with the help of Al Qaeda, Al Nusra and other religious extremist groups. As they host all kinds of armed groups and have opened their borders to Syria for them, Erdogan and Davutoglu are personally responsible for the killing of thousands of Syrians. Why don't the UN punish Turkey for that?

What's the problem with Saudi Arabia?

Saudi Arabia is under huge American pressure and therefore supports certain religious groups fighting here. At the same time, the Kingdom does understand quite well that it acts against its mid-term interests by that. Therefore they should disengage from American dependancy as soon as possible.

(...)

Does the armed opposition really consist only of terrorists, as the state media say every day?

There are several groups, among them many who are just misguided. And of course we, the government, have also made mistakes in the social-economic area. However, the armed opposition was prepared right from the first day. The provokers hid among the peaceful demonstrators and killed many policemen as well as protesters.

(...)



Original link: http://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/k ... 81533.html
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 10 Feb 2013, 16:05
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 10 Feb 2013, 16:13
Some of the so-called rebels said they were ready to discuss with the government, which means that they are losing the war on the ground.
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 10 Feb 2013, 16:17
Quote:
Bashar al-Assad, it sometimes seems, is lucky in his enemies. Controversy and bitter recriminations have been raging in their ranks since the leader of the Syrian opposition coalition (SOC), Moaz al-Khatib, dropped a bombshell by offering talks with Assad's vice-president, Farouq al-Sharaa.

And now confirmation that the White House vetoed Pentagon plans to arm the anti-Assad rebels has underlined just how hard it has been for them to translate political support from the west into practical assistance to achieve victory.

Khatib said he would negotiate with Sharaa if 160,000 prisoners were freed and passports issued for Syrians abroad. But outrage erupted because the SOC's charter states that it will not talk to the regime – except about its departure. Khatib retorted that he was expressing a personal view, but then met the foreign ministers of Russia and Iran, Assad's main backers.

Now, after a flurry of tense consultations, Khatib and colleagues will meet in Cairo this weekend – with the UN envoy Lakhdar Brahimi – for an emergency session to clarify the position.

Others hailed last week's initiative as reflecting the wishes of Syrians desperate to end a war that has killed 60,000 people. Activists of some of the Local Co-ordination Committees have given their qualified support. So has a commander of the Free Syrian Army (FSA).

"Khatib's offer of talks with Assad helped undermine the terrible fear of many that this struggle is existential and will continue until one side has eliminated the other," wrote Joshua Landis on the Syria Comment blog. "To many Syrians who feel that they are mere pawns caught between two clashing giants … [it] provided some hope of a kinder and saner future."

Khatib, a former imam of the historic Umayyad mosque in Damascus, was supposed to usher in an era of unity when he became SOC president in November. The fractious Syrian National Council (SNC) was subsumed into the new body. Its performance was said by the western governments calling for Assad to go to have become more businesslike.

But the SOC is still divided into camps, like the SNC before it. "This initiative has taken us back to square one after all the efforts we made to convince the international community that the opposition was united," complained one activist. "It was handled completely unprofessionally. It was a wasted opportunity."

Kamal Labwani, an independent, warned of "betrayal" and a "fifth column" inside the opposition. "The regime understands only the language of force," he protested. But George Sabra of the SNC – the largest component of the SOC – was more nuanced: he first rejected the initiative but then softened his position, calling for unity and support for the FSA as fighters made new but probably temporary gains on the outskirts of Damascus this week.

Khatib, described as charismatic but a bad listener, is said to dislike foreign-based activists and intellectuals he considers out of touch – disparagingly known as "hotel warriors". Based in Cairo with his own loyal team, he has the support of powerful businessmen from Damascus who are alarmed by the rise of Islamist and jihadi groups in the armed opposition.

"People have criticised Khatib for naivety but there are forces telling him that this is the way to go," said commentator Malik al-Abdeh. "They tell him that if this carries on then everything they have achieved will come crashing down because of the backwoods fighters of the FSA and the jihadis who will destroy Damascus as they have large parts of Aleppo."

Others warn that Khatib's leadership, and that of the SOC, remains far more dependent on external recognition than any internal legitimacy.

The US, Britain and the EU gave Khatib's initiative a cautious welcome while insisting Assad must be held accountable for his crimes – a position that is unlikely to persuade him to step down voluntarily. Only Turkey publicly rejected it.

"We are positive but it would be useful to tie it into other diplomatic efforts," said one western official. Hopes are focusing on Khatib's visit to Moscow next month – and for a shift in Russia's stubbornly pro-Assad position at the UN.

Still, some opposition figures fear foreign pressure to cut a deal. "Lots of friendly countries or those who claim friendship for the Syrian people were waiting for this exact kind of initiative to justify their failure to deliver on military support for the revolt and the protection of civilians," warned Burhan Ghalioun, a former SNC president.

In one sense the whole dispute is a theoretical one since the official Syrian media dismissed Khatib's offer as "political manoeuvring" while Assad himself has said nothing. It still looks as if fighting, not impassioned debates and diplomatic initiatives launched in foreign capitals, will decide the course of this war as it nears its grim second anniversary.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/fe ... alks-assad

Pretty complex picture.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 10 Feb 2013, 16:37
It's funny how facts seems "complex" when it doesn't support your delusions. Those rebels are starting to negociate because they are failing on the ground, especially since their support among the population is decreasing.

http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news- ... ic-support
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 10 Feb 2013, 17:14
It's complex because only a certain faction, not much involved in actual fighting, has said something about negotiations.
Opposition delegations have been openly negotiating with Russia since the beginning, and probably covertly with the Baaths as well.
Still, frag the bourgeois SOC and any negotiators. Only a total wipeout of the Baath scum will mean something.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 10 Feb 2013, 18:00
A total wipeout of the rebels would also mean something, isn't it? It would be the failure of Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Franc, the USA! It's quite something.
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Jun 2011, 08:37
Party Bureaucrat
Post 11 Feb 2013, 04:57
You two are kinda getting carried away a bit there.
Soviet America is Free America!

Under communism, there is no freedom; you are not free to live in poverty, be homeless, to be without an education, to starve, or to be without a job
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Sep 2011, 13:51
Ideology: Democratic Socialism
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Post 11 Feb 2013, 08:23
runequester wrote:
You two are kinda getting carried away a bit there.


Yes it is kinda funny that I almost laughed. Can't we all just get along! HAHA! OK with all jokes aside I'd like to know if you guys actually watch the gruesome videos of heads and other body parts being chopped off and the slow painful murders that take place in Syria. I really doubt anyone coming from a good economical and social background would really wish people into getting slaughtered especially after they see such atrocities in action. This war is pointless and all sides will probably lose in the end. Any rebel movement that puts fear into every ethnic and religious minority in Syria as well as one that attracts the support of countries such as Saudi Arabia or the opportunistic capitalist superpowers is already reason enough to prove that it is a movement not worth supporting. Even the CIA is on the Turkish border preventing the really big guns from getting into FSA hands because they fear a terrorist takeover of the country. The west are supporting a group of loose coalitions without really even knowing who they are dealing with. The FSA haven't made any strategic advances in the war but only attained a few tactical victories. The fact that big army Sunni generals haven't defected should say a lot about the state of affairs shouldn't it?
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The great art of life is sensation, to feel that you exist, even in pain.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 11 Feb 2013, 22:07
They are losing American support. Everything indicates that they are losing the war.
http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/ru ... n-darkness
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 07 Mar 2013, 03:15
French public TV channels (France 2, France 3, and other "French Télévisions" channels, France 24, TV5 Monde and LCP-AN) are about to broadcast every day during 20 days one of 20 propaganda videos made by Shaam News Network or other rebels called "2 minutes for Syria".

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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 09 Mar 2013, 11:14
Quote:
OK with all jokes aside I'd like to know if you guys actually watch the gruesome videos of heads and other body parts being chopped off and the slow painful murders that take place in Syria

Daily, I am subscribed to lots of Syrian channels on youtube.
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Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 09 Mar 2013, 15:44
Watching beheading videos is how Internet-Jihadists start their day.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Nov 2003, 13:17
Ideology: Other
Forum Commissar
Post 11 Mar 2013, 04:46
Please friends, heated discussion is good but please refrain from personal insults.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 26 Mar 2013, 17:06
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
New Comrade (Say hi & be nice to me!)
Post 27 Mar 2013, 02:45
In regards to the Syrian conflict, it's incredibly ridiculous to support one form of imperialism over another as a form of "genuine" anti-imperialist struggle. Russia sending arms to Syria and trying to "establish relations with them" is not anti-imperialism at all. There are MI6 and CIA agents, as well as other "special forces" on the ground in Syria, who are in clear violation of the sovereignty of the Syria and its people. More about that here:

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/view/227911/Syria-will-be-bloodiest-yet/

Quote:
As the unrest and killings escalate in the troubled Arab state, agents from MI6 and the CIA are already in Syria assessing the situation, a security official has revealed.

Special forces are also talking to Syrian dissident soldiers.

They want to know about weapons and communications kit rebel forces will need if the Government decides to help.

“MI6 and the CIA are in Syria to infiltrate and get at the truth,” said the well-placed source.

“We have SAS and SBS not far away who want to know what is happening and are finding out what kit dissident soldiers need.


Also, what was considered a "peaceful protest" against the disparaging conditions of capitalism, such as unemployment, civil rights, falling wages, and so on, has been hijacked by hostile forces who do not wish to address these issues. Counter-revolutionary organizations such as the Free Syrian Army and the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group are both operating in Syria with the covert support of the US-NATO-Israeli alliance. The Gulf Cooperation Council, with countries such as Qatar and Saudi Arabia are also providing support to the FSA and the LIFG. More about that here: http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-al-qaeda-insurgency-in-syria-recruiting-jihadists-to-wage-nato-s-humanitarian-wars/26351

This entire notion that an "Arab Spring" is happening in Syria is a fraud, just like it was in Libya. It is part of a bigger plan to bring containment on Iran, and further the interests of Israel by cutting off those who support the movements in Palestine. Austerity measures, wage freezes, and the so called "structural reforms" of the IMF, which are connected to the foundations of capital, are the most part responsible for the horrific conditions of Syria and the "civil war." This is really a war for the interests of monopolistic trusts, syndicates, and corporations, and not a war that is being waged on behalf of genuine democracy and social justice. Indeed, Bashar Al-Assad and the Baath party have played a role in this. Yet, to support entities such as the Free Syrian Army is a clear demonstration of support for U.S imperialism and Islamist terror.

Supporting the government of Syria doesn't mean supporting everything Assad does. It means extending our greatest solidarity to the Syrian people, it's popular forces, refugees, and it's genuine opposition, who do not want to see their country completely torn apart by invaders from the outside.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 21 Dec 2004, 23:53
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 28 Mar 2013, 07:08
The ABCs of US policy toward Syria

Spoiler: "That is the ABCs of the endless pursuit of regime change by the United States against independent governments whose origin and existence was a consequence of the anti-colonial revolutions that rocked the Middle East in the 1950s and 1960s."
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"By what standard of morality can the violence used by a slave to break his chains be considered the same as the violence of a slave master?" - Walter Rodney
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Aug 2010, 14:21
Party Bureaucrat
Post 17 Apr 2013, 20:58
Quote:
After subjecting Zabadani to heavy rocket fire and repeated incursions, government troops have managed to eject many fighters. Some have fled toward the Lebanese border area in order to avoid being surrounded.

There, they recently made a bid to take over a Palestinian base belonging to the Popular Front for Palestine-General Command that overlooks the international road that links Beirut to Damascus. After several hours of intense fighting, the effort failed.


http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/ba ... our-fronts

Long live our comrades of the Popular Front for Palestine. Death to the rebels.
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"Fishing is part of agriculture" Gred
"Loz, you are like me" Yami
"I am one of the better read Marxists on this site" Gred
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