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40 minutes of in-color life in Stalin's USSR video.

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Soviet cogitations: 62
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Aug 2012, 23:54
Pioneer
Post 24 Nov 2012, 08:54
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgCe6eiyWOI

This video is in Russian- a veteran is discussing his life post-war. He notes the happiness and enthusiasm the people felt in these times- disproving the myth that Soviet people in Stalin's USSR lived in abject terror, fear, and starvation. You can see the sincere joy in people's eyes when they cheer on Stalin on the Red Square. I guess the KGB must have forced them at gunpoint to smile and yell "hooray".


Even for those that do not speak Russian, it is still worth seeing to see that life in Stalin's USSR was not as it is portrayed.
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 24 Nov 2012, 13:38
Yeah, life has become better, life has become merrier... export for the kolkhoz-serfs, workers whose real income reached pre-1913 levels only in the late 30s, party members who could be shot arbitrarily and for no reason, scientists and Marxists taken by the "invisible hand" of Cheka, folks in the GULAG and so on.
Soviet cogitations: 62
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Aug 2012, 23:54
Pioneer
Post 24 Nov 2012, 15:01
--comment removed--

Try to tell my grandmothers, who lived in the Kolkhhoz, that they were serfs- prepare to be spit in your face or worse. In spite of material poverty, which was far worse pre-1917, the peasants received healthcare and education, with cases of tuberculosis, typhus, and other disease going down massively, and peasants receiving education for the first time in Russian history. Illiteracy was virtually eradicated. Child mortality halved. Peasants competed to breed the biggest hog (shown in video), grow the most grain or hemp, and so on- even in the remote villages, there was a spirit of progress and enthusiasm.
--comment removed--

80% of GULAG inmates were violent criminals.
--comment removed--

Party members could not be shot arbitrarily for no reason- this was only the case during the Yezhovschina in 1937, when Yezhov's "troikas" were allowed to commit hasty judgments on people and kill them. Yezhov himself was later killed because of this.

Here are some things that you are clearly not very familiar with, i.e. facts and truth:

Quote:
Shortly before the Central Committee Plenum of January 1938, the press attacked the "false vigilance" of party secretaries who had victimized rank-and-file members to cover themselves. The January 1938 plenum produced a resolution that took a hard line against "certain careerist Communists who are striving to become prominent and to be promoted by recommending expulsions from the party through the repression of party members, who are striving to insure themselves against possible charges of inadequate vigilance through the indiscriminate repression of party members." This type of person "feels it unnecessary to make an objective evaluation of the accusations submitted against the Communist," "indiscriminately spreads panic about enemies of the people" and "is willing to expel dozens of members from the party on false grounds just to appear vigilant himself."

According to the resolution, such persons adopt "a completely incorrect approach, and expel Communists from the party in a criminally frivolous way." The resolution states, "There have been many instances of party organizations, without any verification and thus without any basis, expelling Communists from the party, depriving them of their jobs, frequently even declaring them enemies of the people without any foundation, acting lawlessly and arbitrarily toward party members....

It is time to understand that Bolshevik vigilance consists essentially in the ability to unmask an enemy regardless of how clever and artful he may be, regardless of how he decks himself out, and not in indiscriminate or “on the off-chance’ expulsions, by the tens and hundreds, of everyone who comes within reach."

...The resolution gave several examples in which many expulsions from 1935-36 had been reversed by the higher party bodies or the Party Control Commission. The "heartless, bureaucratic attitude" on the part of the local party leaders allowed this to take place. Leaders were not considering their people on a "careful individual basis" and instead were "acting in an intolerably arbitrary manner."

Getty, A. Origins of the Great Purges. Cambridge, N. Y.: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1985, p. 186

According to official figures released by the Russian government in 1995, of the 681,000 people sentenced to be shot in 1937-38, 92.6% were sentenced by troikas. [It's not Stalin]
Getty & Naumov, The Road to Terror. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Press, c1999, p. 470

I believe there were deficiencies and mistakes. It couldn't have been otherwise with our enemies operating within the security agencies in charge of investigations.... The major deficiencies were that the security agencies had been left without due oversight by the party during certain periods. The negligence was not purposeful. The resources for adequate oversight were insufficient.
Chuev, Feliks. Molotov Remembers. Chicago: I. R. Dee, 1993, p. 287

...These errors were largely caused by the fact that at certain stages the investigations fell into the hands of people who were later exposed as traitors guilty of heinous, hostile, antiparty acts. These belatedly exposed degenerates--traitors within the security agencies and party organizations--obviously at times, with malice aforethought, pushed certain incorrect measures against honest party members and nonparty people. The party and the Soviet state could not permit delay or postponements in carrying out the punitive measures which had become absolutely necessary.... For crude abuses of power People's Commissar for Internal Affairs Yezhov, guilty of certain crude distortions of party policy, was unmasked and then condemned to the "highest measure of punishment."
Chuev, Feliks. Molotov Remembers. Chicago: I. R. Dee, 1993, p. 288
Last edited by Shigalyov on 24 Nov 2012, 19:14, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: insults removed
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 24 Nov 2012, 16:12
Quote:
Try to tell my grandmothers, who lived in the Kolkhhoz, that they were serfs- prepare to be spit in your face or worse.

Yeah, you ask her why she couldn't move out of her village without the approval from the kolkhoz boss and/or the party secretary.
You can then ask her why everyone wanted to move out of the kolhoz.

Quote:
In spite of material poverty, which was far worse pre-1917, the peasants received healthcare and education, with cases of tuberculosis, typhus, and other disease going down massively, and peasants receiving education for the first time in Russian history. Illiteracy was virtually eradicated. Child mortality halved. Peasants competed to breed the biggest hog (shown in video), grow the most grain or hemp, and so on- even in the remote villages, there was a spirit of progress and enthusiasm.

Yeah, there was such ethusiasm about collective farming that everyone who could ran the hell away from it.

Quote:
80% of GULAG inmates were violent criminals. I guess it's best for them to rape each other on the ass and do heroin like in the USA than actually contribute to society, right?

I don't care about criminals, I'm talking about political victims of the Stalinist terror.

Quote:
Party members could not be shot arbitrarily for no reason- this was only the case during the Yezhovschina in 1937, when Yezhov's "troikas" were allowed to commit hasty judgments on people and kill them. Yezhov himself was later killed because of this.

Yeah, and Stalin knew nothing about what Yezhov was doing, he didn't sing any "papers" and wasn't interested in who was being "prosecuted".

Quote:
Here are some things that you are clearly not very familiar with, i.e. facts and truth:

Actually i am because i myself posted some of that a few months ago.
Soviet cogitations: 62
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Aug 2012, 23:54
Pioneer
Post 24 Nov 2012, 17:34
--comment removed--

Funny how tens of millions of peasants moved into the cities to become proletariats, or those who were good in school to become doctors, scientists, and engineers. The urban population in the USSR increased by over 30 million during the first decade of industrialization. I guess they were just teleported in from Africa or China.

People with strong talent in a particular field, such as mathematics or history, of course wanted to move out of the kolkhoz. Were they supposed to build rockets out of cow shit? But of the people were just fine living in the kolkhoz. Of course, life was hard, but still far better than pre-Soviet days. People make good out of what they have. Even though sometimes farmers had to work from morning to evening, work was done collectively and people talked about things while sowing, planting, reaping, etc. In their spare time, people enjoyed relationships with other people, discussing, dancing, and so on. Simple things like getting their first radio made my grandmother's family happy. Often, some guys would bring a movie projector from the city, and everyone would gather around and watch the movie- this would be a great celebratory event.
--comment removed--

Images of life in the collective farms: http://englishrussia.com/2010/12/23/har ... n-kolkhoz/

--comment removed--
Last edited by Shigalyov on 24 Nov 2012, 19:06, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: insults removed
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4465
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 30 Mar 2010, 01:20
Ideology: None
Forum Commissar
Post 24 Nov 2012, 19:11
This topic has quickly degenerated into an insult exchange.

The original video was not provided with a translation - even after a specific request was made.

The topic has been locked for the time being.
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