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What Did People Do In 1990s To Survive?

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Soviet cogitations: 2407
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Nov 2003, 13:17
Ideology: Other
Forum Commissar
Post 17 Aug 2012, 09:15
How did people find work after the Soviet collapse? One man from Siberia told me they would have markets and sell cheap Chinese goods.
Soviet cogitations: 2051
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Jun 2011, 08:37
Party Bureaucrat
Post 17 Aug 2012, 15:13
There's a really interesting book out there, "comparing collapse" or some such which talks about it (and compares to a possible us collapse).

Since factories often produced excess capacity, employees ended up being paid in, or given, warehouse stock that could be traded, for example. Everyone traded everything they could get, and stuck by their families.

It helped that people mostly didn't lose homes (mostly) and public transportation mostly kept running

since there wasn't much to buy to begin with, the currency crashing was less of an impact than it might have been in the west. People continued to barter.
Soviet America is Free America!

Under communism, there is no freedom; you are not free to live in poverty, be homeless, to be without an education, to starve, or to be without a job
Loz
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 11879
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
Philosophized
Post 17 Aug 2012, 16:28
Smuggle cigarettes and other stuffs, steal metals and scrap metals, wood and other things, grow your own food, go to Germany etc. to do some work, get some money from relatives abroad, do some work in the black market, sell whatever you could sell and so on...
These were really horrible times but most people somehow got by...

You don't have to go out of Europe to see how people lived back then, take Kosovo for example where there is still 70+% unemployment...
Soviet cogitations: 455
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Nov 2010, 01:24
Komsomol
Post 17 Aug 2012, 20:33
Criminal forces that offered businesses protection (in fact extorted them) later were absorbed by the status quo. No surprise as they were already fulfilling the states most significant function of protecting capital.
We need to make revolution so our kids wont grow up in corporate prostitution
Sky was the limit. Then the communists came!
Soviet cogitations: 2051
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 24 Jun 2011, 08:37
Party Bureaucrat
Post 17 Aug 2012, 20:48
As Loz says many of the areas never recovered. Look at some of the smaller republics, many of which are crushingly poor
Soviet America is Free America!

Under communism, there is no freedom; you are not free to live in poverty, be homeless, to be without an education, to starve, or to be without a job
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 200
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Jul 2011, 11:37
Ideology: Other Leftist
Pioneer
Post 17 Aug 2012, 21:35
It depends on the place. In the Czech Republic and Slovakia things were basically the same as today in the 90s (in some ways even better than today for example prices) while Russia was horribly poor and Ukraine much more so.
Soviet cogitations: 236
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Jul 2012, 03:04
Ideology: None
Pioneer
Post 12 Dec 2012, 20:27
Well, since Russian goods were being sold to the world market (or in other words feeding the Western Labor Aristocracy) instead of being used to satisfy the needs of the Russian people, people had to take part in Kapitalism to survive.
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Soviet cogitations: 417
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 26 Dec 2012, 17:40
An actual collapse only lasted through 1992-1993 and then briefly in 1998. It wasn't prolonged enough to induce any long-term coping strategies; what did happen was a slight ruralisation (a few percent) and some beggary. The rest was temporary, such as living on supplies (a lot of people had massive stocks of stuff from the late 80s). I think organised crime was the only persistent "coping" strategy, but that wasn't entirely a product of poverty. It did have the unfortunate effect of channeling protest in a "safe" direction; thousands of strong-willed potential rebels went into dead-end crime and died young.

There were, however, a few cases of starvation in 1992-1993, which Gaidar, the neoliberal comissar, dismissed as "market adjustment". Such a shame that the 1993 uprising didn't end in his hanging.
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