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Anti-communist hysteria in Czech Republic

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Soviet cogitations: 3618
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 22 Oct 2004, 15:15
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 12:09
A Google Translation with a few corrections by me:

Quote:
A huge middle finger to the "Communist" Czech President

A bright purple middle finger of ten meters aimed at the presidential residence in Prague, placed a few days before the early parliamentary elections. That can not be a coincidence.

The very prominent sculpture points to the Prague Castle where President Milos Zeman lives right next to the famous Charles Bridge was created and placed by Czech artist David Cerny. It remains there unril after closing of polling, on Saturday, says the creator to AFP.

Cerny makes this gesture to the "communist regime" of the president. Zeman, former member of the Communist Party between 1968-1970, according to the artist still works with his confidants since the former prime minister Petr Necas resigned after a corruption scandal.

This Friday and Saturday are the parliamentary elections in the Czech Republic. The polls show that the social-democratic opposition will win by a landslide. To rule, they need the support of the present-day Communist Party. This parliamentary support would mean that Communists will hold power for the first time since 1989, and Cerny sees as a great danger to his country.

Cerny is known for his controversial work and thus often draws attention to itself. In 2009 he made the artwork Entropa, which was shown in the building of the European Commission in Brussels. He then removed it himself again. The controversial artwork, with blocks parodying all EU member states, was a gift of the Czech Presidency of the EU.

Cerny decided to break down his work in protest against the fall of the Czech government of Mirek Topolánek, which commissioned his work. According to Cerny the Czech Government was hijacked "by a band of pirates." The new government wanted to keep the work, but then said they "respect the freedom of the artist." Cerny gave then returned the grant he had received of 75,000 euros in subsidies and 50,000 euros for costs incurred.


http://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2013/10/23/een ... -tsjechie/

Quote:
Černý flips bird at Czech prez
Bad-boy artist places 10-meter tall rude gesture in view of Prague Castle

Posted: October 21, 2013

By Raymond Johnston, Staff Writer

Černý flips bird at Czech prez

Raymond Johnston

Controversial artist David Černý is giving Prague Castle the finger. His latest installation is a purple hand sitting on a barge in the Vltava River near the National Theater. The 10-meter tall hand's oversized middle finger is unmistakably giving an impolite international sign toward the Castle, seat of Czech President Miloš Zeman.

Zeman is not currently in the country and through a spokesperson said that he did not want to comment on something he has not seen. Černý is well-known for his dislike of Zeman, and helped in the presidential campaign of his rival, Karel Schwarzenberg, in last year's direct presidential elections. The new artwork was made at Meetfactory and towed into place in the early morning hours of Oct. 21. The move comes just days before a special Oct. 25-26 election for Parliament.

Černý discussed his dislike of Zeman with The Prague Post in September. "Our president is just another reason not to live in the Czech Republic," he said. "The political system here is not good, most people know that. I think I'd be happy to live in New York and not come back. I mean, I would come back, maybe for like three months in the year or something."

He also hinted at that time that he had more provocative art up his sleeve. "I am proud of my work," he said in September. "But the thing I am proud of the most, is not what I have done, but what I know I am capable of doing in the future. The future is what I have to the most proud of. You will just have to wait and see."

This isn't the first time Černý has used a middle finger in his art. His first famous work, The Pink Tank, also had that gesture placed on top of a Soviet tank that was part of a monument. It was supposedly the first Soviet tank to enter Prague in 1945. Černý's modifications came shortly after the Velvet Revolution. He also used the finger gesture in combination with barbed wire for an anti-communism campaign.

He made headlines with Entropa, a piece made to coincide with the Czech presidency of the European Union in 2009. It was supposed to have works from artists across Europe but was instead all his own work, with thinly veiled insults for most countries.

But not all of his work hits people's nerves. The babies crawling up the Žižkov TV tower and the upside-down St. Wenceslas in the Lucerna pasáž have proven to be popular tourist attractions.

A show of his more recent work starts Oct. 24 at Dvorak Sec Contemporary gallery on Dlouhá 5 in Prague 1.

Raymond Johnston can be reached at
rjohnston@praguepost.com.

http://www.praguepost.com © The Prague Post 2013


http://www.praguepost.com/print.php?url ... -prez.html

Quote:
Hanged dummies in Czech towns warn against communist danger
Pět figurín oběšenců s červenou oprátkou kolem krku a nápisem Šel proti KSČ(M) na hrudi se 21. října kolem 22:30 objevilo nad vchodem do Domu kultury odborů v Jihlavě. Figuríny mají symbolizovat více než 250 lidí popravených v Československu z politických důvodů za komunistického režimu a upozornit na to, že po nynějších sněmovních volbách hrozí nárůst vlivu komunistů, řekl ČTK Ondřej Matyáš z občanského sdružení Dekomunizace, které akci organizuje. Podobné figuríny se mají v noci či brzy ráno objevit i v Praze, Táboře a Hradci Králové.

vydáno: 22.10.2013, 08:02 | aktualizace: 22.10.2013 08:12

Prague - Five hanged dummies, with red nooses around their necks and an inscription "He opposed the KSC(M)" on their chests have appeared hanging from lamp posts in Prague and other Czech towns, installed by anti-communist activists to warn against the rising influence of the Communists (KSCM).

The dummies symbolise more than 250 people whom the communist regime (1948-89) executed for political reasons, and warn that the KSCM´s influence may increase after the October 25-26 general election, Jiri Novak, from the Decommunisation civic group, told CTK.

Already on Monday night, the activists installed five dummies in Jihlava, south Moravia, and further appeared at Klarov crossroads in the centre of Prague and also on a bridge in the east Bohemian capital Hradec Kralove overnight.

Some more are yet to be installed in Tabor, south Bohemia, Novak said, adding that the activists have chosen the towns randomly.

Decommunisation presents itself as a group striving to strip the KSCM and its members of their share in power in the Czech Republic by permanently recalling the crimes of communism.

The activists say the KSCM is a successor to the pre-1989 Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSC), and it has never dissociated itself from the KSC´s dark practices. On the contrary, the present Communists openly claim their adherence to the KSC´s legacy, Decommunisation says on its website.

The group´s founding fathers were well-known personalities including Ivan Medek, a journalist and pre-1989 anti-communist dissident who headed the then president Vaclav Havel´s office in 1996-1998.

The KSCM, in political opposition since the November 1989 fall of the communist regime, is one of the strongest Czech parties.

Political analysts say the upcoming election may produce a minority government of the Social Democrats (CSSD) leaning on the KSCM´s support.

Autor: ČTK
http://www.ctk.cz
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http://www.ceskenoviny.cz/news/zpravy/h ... ger/998444

Interesting developments. Here is some more info on the president: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miloš_Zeman

To be honest, looking at his stated political opinions, he looks like an all right chap for a social-democratic politician, if not very tactful. His opponent in January's presidential election was Prince Schwarzenberg, a descendant of one of the foremost families of the Habsburg Empire, who lived in Austria from 1948 till 1990. That guy was Minister of Foreign Affairs in the massively corrupt Czech government that was forced to resign last summer. With the president, on the other hand, it has proved difficult to stitch him up on corruption allegations so far.

And of course our brave dissident artist supported that government fiercely, and of course he basically says that he hates his own country and would rather live in New York. Very interesting how guys like this are always so righteous when it comes to opposing even the most slightly left-wing politicians, and how they're always so soft on an utterly corrupt and unscrupulous guy like Necas. In his upside-down world, an early election is "dictatorial" and "communist". It would of course be much more "democratic" not to let the people decide after a massive organised crime scandal implicating the government.

What do people think of the prospect of the KSCM becoming a kingmaker? Of course, it remains to be seen whether they will actually cooperate with a new social-democratic government. Usually, these claims are made on the one hand by right-wingers fearmongering against the left, and on the other hand by the usual collection of Trotskyists, anarchists, etc. predicting the next betrayal by the evil Stalinists by joining the government. For instance, in the last Greek elections, certain fora were full of people claiming that the KKE was going to join a government with PASOK and/or ND, and that SYRIZA was the only true "radical" option. We know how that turned out.

In a country like the Czech Republic, maybe the social-democrats will sooner govern with the right than with the communists, although I don't know enough about the Czech situation to be sure of that. From their own statements, of course, the KSCM are also saying that their support, if it's going to happen at all, isn't going to come cheap. The KSCM do seem to be more moderate and socially accepted than many other European communist parties, and I believe they already co-operate with the social-democrats on the regional level.

So do people think it would be a good thing? One interesting thing to bear in mind is that guys like Schwarzenberg are prominent in the European effort to get communism recognised as equal to Nazism, and for prosecuting those who "deny communist crimes" as equal to Holocaust denial. The youth wing was banned from 2006 until 2010, and in 2008 there were efforts to ban the KSCM itself, only because they base themselves on the Communist Manifesto. The Czech Republic is one of the few countries where the communists stayed in parliament and are now actually improving their share of votes. If a Czech government depended on them, obviously the efforts of institutionalising anti-communism would suffer a massive blow.

Some articles by the Communists themselves:

Quote:
P of Bohemia and Moravia, The basic information about development leading towards early election in Czech Republic [En.]
Friday, 20 September 2013 09:29 Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia
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The basic information about development leading towards early election in Czech Republic

September 11, 2013

Three years after 2010 Parliamentary election, a political situation in Czech Republic reached a state of a radical solution. The ruling coalition (Right-wing parties like the Civil Democrats (ODS), the TOP 09 and the Věci veřejné [the Public Affairs]) not only has been increasingly loosing a trust of the general public, expressing its negative attitudes towards the coalition between 85 and 90 percentage points, but it has also been fragmented from inside. As a consequence of a huge corruption affair from the nearest circle around our Prime Minister Petr Necas, his government has resigned in June 16, 2013.

At June 23, President Miloš Zeman charged well-known economist, Mr. Jiri Rusnok, former minister in Soc-Dem governments (Minister of Finance amongst others; a member of Soc-Dem Party between 1998 and 2010) to form so-called caretaker government.

President Zeman appointed the Rusnok's government in July 10. Right-wing parties vehemently protested against President's processing, accusing him of “Constitution spirit”'s violating, and arguing by so-called “majority of 101” in the Chamber of Deputies (Lower House of Czech Parliament). They argued these 101 votes to be enough to authorize them to create a new government, which would, as they said, get a majority for its trust by the Lower House of Czech Parliament.

It has not been confirmed, however, on Parliamentary session at August 7, attempting for the trust to the caretaker government. The trust wasn't given to this government at all; but in the same time, it has been shown there is no the “majority of 101” from total of 200 MPs. The development has begun definitely to strive for an early election.

As experts guess, some essential changes can be expected on current Czech political scene. Generaly, it is expected the Left-wing can strengthen, recording higher number of votes by both the Soc-Dem and the Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia (KSCM). On the contrary, Right-wing parties would get an important loss, although it can be expected that the TOP 09 of ex-ministers Karel Schwarzenberg (foreign affairs) and Miroslav Kalousek (finance) would take over some part of Civic Democrat Party's (ODS) electorate. Some parties will abandon the Chamber (the Věci veřejné and the LIDEM), and some other ones will probably come back (Christian Democrats), or any of new subjects can come into; for example, the SPOZ (a party close to President Zeman), the ANO movement of a billionaire Andrej Babiš, and, with small percentage, smaller parties or movements, like the Suverenita (Sovereignty) Party of former MEP Jana Bobošíková, the LEV 21 Party of ex-Prime Minister Jiří Paroubek or the Úsvit (the Down) movement of an entrepreneur and a Senator Tomio Okamura.

On its extraordinary session at August 20, the Lower House has dissolved itself as expected. 174 MPs presented (from total of 200) 140 MPs voted for. From the very beginning, the KSCM has promoted the early election, regarding it as the only possible, correct and clear solution of current political crisis, which would paralyze a political life in the country for long-time, to be reflected also in the economics, the international prestige and a social climate in general.

Chairman of the KSČM's CC, cme. Vojtěch Filip, has stated, that “the Parliament has allowed to the Czech political scene to get both the new power and the trustworthyness.” “It will be gained”, he added, “by getting a new legitimacy to the Parliament by citizens, it would be functional again.” The KSCM is ready for an election. Primary election has taken place within the party, the lists of candidates have been prepared, as well as the election programme. One week ago, through a communist daily of Halo Noviny, President Miloš Zeman indicated that if the Lower House will be dissolved, he wouldn't postpone the date of election, announcing it probably on October 25 and 26, 2013. In this case, the party must present their lists of candidates by September 17, to be registered by regional administrative 25 days before election the latest, what means by the end of September. On Thursday, August 22, a meeting of KSCM's Executive Committee was held, and, consequently, a session of KSCM's CC, too.

President Milos Zeman has officially dissolved the Lower House in August 28, announcing the early Parliamentary election to be held in October 25 and 26, 2013.

There were some speculations about possible candidacy of former President Vaclav Klaus, as to be announced by Ms. Jana Bobosikova, former MEP and currently the chairperson of the Suverenita (the Sovereignty) Party, as well by some MPs, who leaved the Civic Democrats Party. However, these speculations haven't come true. It can be likely, however, he could be leading the candidate list of Eurosceptics in 4014 election to the European Parliament.

The KSCM launches officially its pre-election campaign in September 7, on the Meeting of Citizens under the Kuneticka Hora castle, near the town of Pardubice in Eastern Bohemia. Some party candidates have been presented there, keeping first pre-election discussions amongst citizens. Nowadays, the KSCM comes with two strong topics - a demand of the referendum about the validity of the Church restitutions, and the Financial Disclosure Report Law to be approved, given to the wealth's origin of the rich to be proved.

The KSCM presents 343 candidates in total within country's all 14 regions (it means full candidate lists as given by the law).

Finally, the last poll: First Social Democrats 28 per cent, following by TOP 09 with 13 per cent, Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia 12.5 per cent, Civil Democrats 9.5 per cent, the ANO with 7 per cent, both the Usvit and the SPOZ 5.5 per cent.

KSCM, International Department, Sept 11, 2013


http://solidnet.org/czech-republic-comm ... epublic-en

Quote:
CP of Bohemia and Moravia, Statement [En.]
Tuesday, 22 October 2013 13:45 Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia
E-mail Print PDF

17th session of Executive Committee of KSCM's CC

October 10, 2013, says:

The only alternative of current political marasmus is

Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia

Only few days remain for the opp0rtunity to determine our fate in the Czech Republic 's early Parliamentary election, to be held in October 25 and 26. The last right-wing government of Prime Minister Petr Necas had shown itself as one of corruption, decay and disaster.

Especially, the Veci Verejne Party had become an example showing what the creation of business plans of some pressure groups or individuals can lead to, having the goal to fit the law to their needs through political power.

As it has turned out in this election similar political parties couldn't be spared. It means, especially, the ANO 2011 Movement of the billionaire Andrej Babis or the Úsvit přímé demokracie (Direct Democracy Down) Party of current Senator Tomio Okamura.

The Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia warns about those so-called “disposable” parties, calling upon every voter to exercise his/her right to vote and to come to the ballot box in October 25 or 26, 2013. It is solely up to us, if we do so either to build an economically and socially powerful state or to continue to stagger within both the debt spiral and the corruption as unleashed by the right-wing governments of the past.

The Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia is the only true left-wing party on Czech current political stage. Both its election programme and its daily politics go ahead together hand-in-hand in favour of the vast majority of the Czech Republic 's population. All this won't work without you; come out to vote, to give your votes to the Number 21, the one of the Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia !


http://solidnet.org/czech-republic-comm ... atement-en

Quote:
The current work and struggles of the KSM in 2013 Tisk E-mail
Čtvrtek, 20 červen 2013

The KSM has entered the year 2013 with the results of its last 10th Congress which was held on December 1st, 2012 in Olomouc. It was the first Congress of our organization since the extraordinary legalizing Congress organized immediately after the defeat over the ban of the KSM in 2010. One of the most important outcomes of the Congress was an Appeal for the building of the antiimperialist anti-war movement in the Czech Republic. The antiimperialist struggle has been and is one of the pillars of the work of the KSM. We are waging campaign especially in defence of Syria, Cuba and Venezuela. The KSM organizes meetings with the people, for example meetings where the KSM's delegate, who attended the solidarity mission in Syria in 2012, informs the public about the imperialist war against this country. The KSM has also created a special facebook page for the defence of Syria and actively participated at demonstrations in this cause. The KSM's activists also directly confronted a so called dissident blogger Yoani Sánchez at public debates during her anti-Cuban tour in the Czech Republic in March 2013. The KSM closely co-operates in these struggles with Society of Czech-Cuban friendship and with Czech Peace Movement.

We have participated at social struggles against the current right-wing government and its anti-popular "reforms", including great trade union demonstrations in Prague attended by more than 100 000 working class people.

Together with a student union called SOS Student the KSM has been active at a campaign against the introduction of tuition fees at public universities and a representative of the KSM has delivered a commentary speech at the petition committee at the Parliament of the Czech Republis on this issue.

The KSM has participated in struggle for basic democratic and human rights, such as in the case of a young bus driver Roman Smetana, who was sentenced to imprisonment on the ground of a legal accusation raised by the government party ODS for making drawings on the election posters of the parliamentary parties. This legal case has uncovered a crude reality of our country where a citizen may be imprisoned for drawing feelers on the heads of parliamentary parties politicians.

The young Communists have been present at recent period of time in struggle against so called church restitution, i.e. granting more than 96 bil. CZK to the churches, a vast majority to the catholic church. This bill of law was unfortunately passed in the Parliament meaning an incredible robbery of the national wealth and bringing this process of the expropriation of the people of our country launched in 1989 almost to completion.

The most recent initiative of the KSM has been a creation of the Czech preparatory committee for organizing a delegation to the 18th World Festival of Youth and Students in Ecuador.

May 13, 2013


http://www.ksm.cz/english/the-current-w ... -2013.html

Poll of 21 October:

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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 13:18
Very interesting; thanks for bringing this to my attention, and for the analysis.

No 14 wrote:
And of course our brave dissident artist supported that government fiercely, and of course he basically says that he hates his own country and would rather live in New York.


Russian liberals are exactly the same; they recognize that the majority remains socialist in orientation, and chalk it up to the fact that the majority is an uneducated, 'bydlo' mass. It's interesting to see this phenomenon in a developed, civilized country like the Czech Republic. It's amazing to me the Left remains so strong there despite the fact that the Czechs had probably the most successful transition to capitalism in the Eastern Bloc (as far as I understand it they didn't entirely flatten their industrial base or turn it over to crooked businessmen).

As far as working with the social democrats, I would support them if they got the chance to do it. The Czech Republic exists within powerful supernational entity, with political, economic, ideological, and socio-cultural pressures exerted from all sides. I've come to the conclusion that there is little communist parties can do in small or medium-sized countries except to work to help their countrymen in any practical way possible. This includes participation in the formal political process and coalitions with other progressive parties. The fight against equating communism to Nazism is a project of tremendous importance for Europe as a whole, because the success of this project would justify the behaviour of the European Right, would heavily stain the history of the Left, and would set Europe up for a new rise in radical right wing politics. Whatever the KSCM can do to practically improve the lives of ordinary Czechs is also positive, both in itself and for the image of the far Left.
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 14 Jul 2008, 20:01
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Philosophized
Post 23 Oct 2013, 22:19
Quote:
The fight against equating communism to Nazism is a project of tremendous importance for Europe as a whole


Indeed. Western European countries do this more subtly by using words like "extremism", whining over how abhorrent "every kind of extremism" is, because "extremists" alone use violence while capitalism is a peaceful system. It is incredibly dangerous and I've personally experienced how it turns people away from the ideas of Marxism. And I agree that this is a tremendously important project, but we should face the fact that the stalinist regimes committed horrendous crimes and parties like the KSCM, the KKE or the DKP should not be afraid to admit that. The theory of extremism works so well because people remember how their grandmothers got raped by Red Army soldiers. It works so well because presents stalinism and communism as synonyms, which they are not, because the politics of stalinism were a product of unique circumstances.
"Don't know why i'm still surprised with this shit anyway." - Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 22:43
Noting that the politics of Stalinism were a product of unique circumstances is one thing; 'facing up to horrendous crimes' is another thing entirely. I am not at all against historical objectivity, but there is a very fine line to walk between admitting mistakes made in the name of the movement and conceding to the propaganda of our enemies. Just think about how many comrades in Western countries were turned away from the radical Left after Khrushchev's self-serving denunciation of Stalin, and its impact on the creation of a Soviet liberal intelligentsia bent on destroying socialism. The whole tragedy in the historical analysis of the Soviet project lies in the fact that in the midst of some of the greatest achievements in contemporary human history, there were also moments of frailty, and cruelty. If we lack historical objectivity and place more weight on the errors made by our predecessors than on what they managed to achieve, our enemies will have won. For them it proves that we are in the wrong, thereby tarnishing the ideology, and forever associating it with what is built up as a mythical period of unprecedented evil, eventually equated with the evils of Nazism and the like. Therefore I propose a very careful approach in evaluating the achievements and failures of one of the most difficult projects in human history; it is a project that continues to hold value for the world, and especially for the country where it first originated, and an objective evaluation is thereby of the utmost importance.
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 22:53
Quote:
Noting that the politics of Stalinism were a product of unique circumstances is one thing; 'facing up to horrendous crimes' is another thing entirely. I am not at all against historical objectivity, but there is a very fine line to walk between admitting mistakes made in the name of the movement and conceding to the propaganda of our enemies.

I don't see how the Hunger or the Terror ( and a hundred other things ) aren't, objectively speaking, some of the worst crimes in history. Especially considering how all that was done in a supposedly socialist country. No fascist country, except Nazi Germany, came even close to such bestial cruelty. Gramsci in Italy was treated better than the hundreds of thousands of communists imprisoned and killed in the Stalinist violence.

Quote:
Just think about how many comrades in Western countries were turned away from the radical Left after Khrushchev's self-serving denunciation of Stalin, and its impact on the creation of a Soviet liberal intelligentsia bent on destroying socialism.

They were turned away because they learned only a part of the truth about the crimes committed under Stalin. A normal reaction, i think.
And if anyone is to be blamed for the liberal intelligentsia's anticommunism it's first and foremost Stalin, who literally murdered and imprisoned perhaps a good third of Soviet intelligentsia and poisoned all aspects of intellectual activity of any sort.

Quote:
If we lack historical objectivity and place more weight on the errors made by our predecessors than on what they managed to achieve, our enemies will have won.

Whatever has been achieved doesn't exist anymore. And that's entirely thanks to the "errors" made by "our predecessors".
Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 23:04
Anyway, communists should be even more vocal in the condemnation of Stalinism than the bourgeoisie. Aside from liberals they weren't really bothered by the butchering of the best communists in the 30s, why would they be anyway? It's known that Mussolini thought Stalin had turned fascist. And imperialist powers had no problem cooperating with Stalin's USSR. The bourgeoisie could only have been happy for what happened.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 12 Jun 2006, 02:14
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Post 23 Oct 2013, 23:18
Mabool wrote:
[ The theory of extremism works so well because people remember how their grandmothers got raped by Red Army soldiers.

That's probably because their grandparent was shot down in the East before he could tell them how he raped all those slavic girls.


Loz wrote:
Whatever has been achieved doesn't exist anymore. And that's entirely thanks to the "errors" made by "our predecessors".

That doesn't mean we should denounce their achievements. We should question ourselves, what are we doing to get those achievements back?


"Where Argentina goes, Latin America will go".
Leonid Brezhnev

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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 14 Jul 2008, 20:01
Ideology: Trotskyism
Philosophized
Post 23 Oct 2013, 23:27
Quote:
what are we doing to get those achievements back?


We don't cling to the mistakes that made us lose them. Besides, let's not forget that Stalinism can be blamed for fascism. From this point of view, considering their causal interrelationship, an association of stalinism with fascism is actually correct. Stalinism has been immensely helpful to the bourgeoisie because it has effectively bought almost a century of extra time for capitalism. With correct methods and tactics, fascism could have been prevented by revolution.
"Don't know why i'm still surprised with this shit anyway." - Loz
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 06 Dec 2009, 23:17
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Post 24 Oct 2013, 06:39
Quote:
That's probably because their grandparent was shot down in the East before he could tell them how he raped all those slavic girls.

The Soviet Army didn't behave much better even in friendly countries like Yugoslavia. They raped regardless of "race" and age. Even some conc. camp prisoners and Russian forced laborers in Germany were raped, maybe even on a mass scale.

Quote:
That doesn't mean we should denounce their achievements

No normal person would denounce the Soviet support for national-liberation and democratic movements, and other things such as free healthcare and education and so on.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 22 Oct 2004, 15:15
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Post 24 Oct 2013, 09:15
Mabool wrote:
The theory of extremism works so well because people remember how their grandmothers got raped by Red Army soldiers. It works so well because presents stalinism and communism as synonyms, which they are not, because the politics of stalinism were a product of unique circumstances.


Oh come on, how many people are really anti-communists because of that? Even if we accept the thesis of "Stalinism", it would still be impossible to claim that the rapes committed by the Red Army are somehow an exponent of Stalinism, rather than the result of the most brutal war of extermination in modernity.

If people in the Western European countries (by the way, in my view the Czech Republic is hardly 'Eastern' European, and even as a Central European country, it has always been very close to the border with the 'West') think that communism is extremism, it's usually not because of Stalin. It's rather that the level of struggle and consciousness is still such that any kind of social revolution does indeed look extremist, because the need for that has not yet become apparent in practice, and the theoretical and organisational state of the workers' movement is still such that it is not yet possible to win a significant section of it for communist viewpoints.

Stalin is a distraction from the bare facts. It's just a cop-out by "anti-Stalinists" to justify their own stagnation. 60 years after Stalin and 20 years after the USSR, that shit just does not fly any more. How come the strongest anti-Stalinists are in pretty much the exact same position they've been in since the foundation of the Fourth International? I mean, aside from rightist anti-Stalinisms like Eurocommunism, which I don't think anybody here adheres to, and which are in decline as well.

What's funny is that those communist parties that are growing today are the ones that never found it necessary to make these self-flagellating denunciations of "Stalinism", but don't identify with it either. On the other hand, the communist parties that form the core of the "Party of the European Left", which considers the denunciation of Stalinism fundamental to its politics (link are still struggling for relevance.

How did that happen? I have never heard a single reason why these parties should take on this course of action that you advocate. Why would they want to suddenly make a 180-degree turn and denounce their entire history? They would then basically cease to be communist parties and they might as well merge with whatever Trotskyist sect is closest to their new line.

This idea that the "denunciation of Stalinism" is somehow a litmus test for communist parties is a load of old bollocks. What you're basically demanding is that they adopt your theoretical framework and your opinions on the minutiae of 20th-century history wholesale and become Trotskyists.
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Soviet cogitations: 417
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 15 Nov 2012, 01:18
Komsomol
Post 24 Oct 2013, 10:12
Quote:
And if anyone is to be blamed for the liberal intelligentsia's anticommunism it's first and foremost Stalin, who literally murdered and imprisoned perhaps a good third of Soviet intelligentsia and poisoned all aspects of intellectual activity of any sort.

Good to see people realising this.
Russian "liberals" are the exact mirror image of stalinism; the same totalitarian attitudes, the same hatred of dissent from their views, the same love for violence and militarism in support of their regime, the same paranoia, the same hatred for real left-communists.
Indeed, by decimating leftist intellectual life and killing the old revolutionary guard, stalinism totally laid the path for these "liberals" to emerge within the intelligentsia and mid-rank nomenclatura.


English only, please
-Praxicoide
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Soviet cogitations: 4405
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 24 Oct 2013, 11:34
The Hunger was not state policy. As for the Terror, it was a combination of real threats and personally motivated vendettas and power struggles which turned into a colossus with its own logic. In some ways, as I'm beginning to realize, it was also a continuation of the struggle between the Westernizers and the Slavophiles within the communist movement itself. I don't know how many times we've discussed all these difficult issues on here, with debate usually leading away from simplification. You've been here long enough to witness and participate in these debates Loz, and yet you sound as if for the first time you've come across some journalist's take on Stalin in some liberal publication.

Loz wrote:
They were turned away because they learned only a part of the truth about the crimes committed under Stalin. A normal reaction, i think.


Yeah, like the fact that Stalin planned military operations on a giant globe!1

Loz wrote:
And if anyone is to be blamed for the liberal intelligentsia's anticommunism it's first and foremost Stalin, who literally murdered and imprisoned perhaps a good third of Soviet intelligentsia and poisoned all aspects of intellectual activity of any sort.


Only a person with an absolute lack of understanding about the USSR's scientific and cultural achievements during the Stalin era and the groundwork it laid for the future of the USSR's technical and industrial base could make such a statement. I know you're not such a person Loz, so what gives?

Loz wrote:
Whatever has been achieved doesn't exist anymore. And that's entirely thanks to the "errors" made by "our predecessors".


The intellectual triumph of anticommunism in the USSR came about as a result of outright lies and slander against the events and personalities that made all the USSR's past victories possible. It came about because a numerically insignificant group of liberal sixtiesnicks, influenced by Khrushchev's politicking, were given control of all the informational resources of the state virtually overnight. These people didn't care if what they were talking about or not was true; the point was to destroy the system by any means necessary. If someone tripped and fell in Stalin's USSR they would blame the state; their purpose was not to discover and present the truth, but to destroy the socialist nature of the country. A quick analysis of how the media machine treats any leader or country that tries to forge a semi-independent political and socio-economic path shows that it's either continual condemnation, or shamelessly displaying the guy's bloodied carcass as it's being carried through the streets.

...

Mabool wrote:
Besides, let's not forget that Stalinism can be blamed for fascism. From this point of view, considering their causal interrelationship, an association of stalinism with fascism is actually correct. Stalinism has been immensely helpful to the bourgeoisie because it has effectively bought almost a century of extra time for capitalism. With correct methods and tactics, fascism could have been prevented by revolution.


So social democrats and communists uniting against the Nazis would have resulted in world communist revolution? I don't know if you can recall it, but these two Left groups had quite an antagonistic past history, namely because when it came down to the important things (like imperialist war) soc-dems were quick to line up with the interests of the bourgeoisie. Hindsight is 20/20. In the 1930s communists weren't sure who would come after them first -fascists or their 'fellow Leftists'. Given that the product of what you call Stalinism played the decisive role in smashing Nazism and saving humanity from slavery, I can't think of a more insulting intellectual manipulation than the idea that 'Stalinism caused Nazism'.

...

Sans, that picture is much more clever and interesting without the obtuse thought bubble explanation.
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 22 Oct 2004, 15:15
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Politburo
Post 26 Oct 2013, 22:20
The elections are over. The social-democrats have won, as expected, but by a much smaller margin than what the polls predicted. They barely won with 20.46%, followed by the party ANO at 18.65%. This latter party was founded by a billionaire, Andrej Babis, as a right-wing "anti-corruption" alternative to the ODS, disgraced in the corruption scandal.

The Communist Party warned against such parties, founded as business schemes. A similar populist right-wing party, VV, got a good share of the votes in 2010, participated in the government, but also became embroiled in the scandal. Hence the KSCM's criticism of these "disposable parties". ANO had a massive campaign budget. Unfortunately, we see here that many people are still willing to vote for whatever happens to be the novelty party of the day.

The communists themselves got 14.91%, their best result in a decade. The coalition formation is expected to be complicated because of these results. The social-democrats and communists will not have a majority together.
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Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 22 Oct 2004, 15:15
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Politburo
Post 27 Nov 2013, 20:19
Quote:
18. session of Executive Committee of KSCM's CC, Nov 22, 2013 states: Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia keeps its promises

The post-election negotiations following the early Parliamentary election between the ANO 2011 movement and the Soc-Dems leading to a possible three-part-coalition (with participation of Christian Democrats) shows a questionable decision made by the Soc-Dems to start this kind of negotiation. Moreover, it shows sharp discrepancies in programmes of both of these parties; especially, the issues are the taxes, the church restitutions, the second pillar of pension reform to be cancelled, to implement compulsorily the cash registers with fiscal memory, or setting of centralized collection points to be postponed.

Clearly, a tendency to retreat from the pre-election promises is outlined. You can see it mostly on the Soc-Dems' side. They don't longer insist on the Church Restitution Act to be either cancelled or postponed; they aren't able to enforce it against the entrepreneurs' strong lobby as represented by Mr. Andrej Babis with his the ANO 2011 movement as ell as to enforce the implementation of progressive taxation or higher taxation of large companies.

As for the so-called church restitutions, the Soc-Dems take a negative position towards the idea of a general referendum on this issue; they accept that any possible revision of this issue would depend only on negotiations with the churches, refusing to be supported by the decisively negative stance of the citizens on this issue. The Christian Democrats are fundamentally against this revision; the ANO 2011 remains rather unclear, attempting to take no responsibility for it.

Every fundamental promise can so remain out of any possible coalition agreement. And there is also a clear effort to postpone the key issues in time, letting them to fall into oblivion.

By this, the Soc-Dems fling down the gauntlet to the other Parliamentary parties, of which aim should be to come up to the expectations of majority of the voters that the previous manner of ruling could come into end. The promise given to the electorate should be superior to any politicking over power positions.

The Communist Party of Bohemia & Moravia is ready to put actively on the table the topics like the so-called Church Restitution Act to be revised, the taxation of both natural and juristic persons to be implemented or the second pillar of pension reform to be cancelled. We have submitted a proposal to postpone the new Civil Code coming into force. We will require the Property Reports not only from the politicians, but also from every citizen above some certain line of property. We would like to realize the changes needed with everyone with both the political will and respect towards the promises given to the voters.


http://solidnet.org/czech-republic-comm ... romises-en

Not surprising, I guess, given the result.
Soviet cogitations: 724
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 01 Mar 2011, 14:10
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Komsomol
Post 10 Dec 2013, 20:00
soviet78 wrote:
So social democrats and communists uniting against the Nazis would have resulted in world communist revolution? I don't know if you can recall it, but these two Left groups had quite an antagonistic past history, namely because when it came down to the important things (like imperialist war) soc-dems were quick to line up with the interests of the bourgeoisie. Hindsight is 20/20. In the 1930s communists weren't sure who would come after them first -fascists or their 'fellow Leftists'. Given that the product of what you call Stalinism played the decisive role in smashing Nazism and saving humanity from slavery, I can't think of a more insulting intellectual manipulation than the idea that 'Stalinism caused Nazism'.
A relevant quote:

"A genuine misunderstanding within the ranks of the Comintern [in regard to fascism] also existed. First, it did not consider seriously the possibility that conclusions could be drawn from the Italian experience. This was seen somehow as an event unique to backward, peripheral societies, and not to advanced, 'democratic' ones. Second, the Comintern on the whole tended to equate any military/authoritarian regime with fascism. Third, its dim view of social democracy as 'social fascist' was by no means new. It had used the term as early as 1924, prior to Stalin's ascendancy, when describing social democracy's role in bringing about post-war capitalist stabilization in Germany, and in doing so it had cooperated with the right-wing paramilitary Frei Korps.

Fourth, the German SPD was responsible for expelling KPD members from trade unions and killing 25 May Day demonstrators in Berlin, in 1929. Fifth, the Grand Coalition government headed by the Social Democratic Herman Müller was antagonistic towards the Soviet Union. Indeed, from a Soviet point of view the capitalist West had been hostile towards it since 1917, whatever the political hue of their governments. Sixth, while the Comintern's optimism about the rapid demise of Hitler was simplistic, this in part derived from an economism found in Marxism and Marx himself. Unemployment throughout the advanced capitalist countries had reached record levels, and few predicted that Hitler would be able to bring about a dramatic revival of the German economy...

However, even if [Trotsky's] united front recommendations, 'from above and below' were in fact implemented by a KPD leadership, the difficulties in achieving cooperation need acknowledgement. The SPD leadership had a deep distrust of the KPD, and treated the occasion offer of cooperation with a good deal of cynicism... A final obstacle to unity lay in a sociological fact: the overwhelming bulk of SPD members were relatively well-paid and unionized, while the KPD consisted largely of the unemployed."
(Jules Townshend. The Politics of Marxism: The Critical Debates. New York: Leicester University Press. 1996. pp. 117-118.)
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Soviet cogitations: 589
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Dec 2013, 14:24
Ideology: Democratic Socialism
Unperson
Post 13 Dec 2013, 11:46
After 40 odd years of repression at the hands of the Soviet puppet regime they had ruling over them, can you blame the Czechs? I’d hate communism to if I grew up under that vile regime. The only time it was popular was during the Prague Spring and what happened then? The Soviets and other Warsaw pact countries invaded it to halt the reforms.
How do you expect them to react towards communism?
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Soviet cogitations: 14448
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Sep 2006, 22:05
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Philosophized
Post 13 Dec 2013, 20:43
Oh so now reforms are something worthwhile. Interesting about-face. The Prague Spring had to be crushed.
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