Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Active ]
[ Login ]
Log-in to remove these advertisements.

30 years since failed socialist coup in the USSR

POST REPLY
[+-]
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 9230
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 19 Mar 2005, 20:08
Embalmed
Post 10 Nov 2005, 00:23
Image


On the night of November 9th, 1975 during a navy parade in Riga, the battleship "Storozhevoy" mutinied headed by a third ranked officer Valeriy Sablin. The officer of the USSR navy tried to take down Brezhnev's regime. Sablin wanted to lead the ship to Kronstadt (or Sweden by other reports) but this attempt ended tragically as the ship was attacked by Soviet aviation and Sablin was arrested. He was sentenced to death by firing squad June 13th 1976.

He did not have many resources, and with a mutinied battleship and a handful of sailors, he took the course for Leningrad.Sablin as an officer was supposed to keep the sailors in line with the national ideology, and was an yet as he studied the classics of marxism-leninism he was even more assured of the Kremlins wrong path.

In November 1975, Sablin told some of his members about his plan of a coup. After the military parade of the 58th anniversary of the October Revolution Storozhevoy would not go to its home port but to Leningrad. There Sablin wanted to stop next to the legendary kreyser Avrora and make a televised address demanding freedom of speech, fight against party inheritance, bureocratic priveliges, as it is called for true socialism.

8th October evening he showed his sailors the film "Ironclad Potemkin" to raise morale. With a fiery speech, he persuaded his sailors to fight for the revolution. The ship was pursuited as it was feare thet the crew might defect to Sweden with the day's most modern equipment. Brezhnev ordered to stop the ship at any cost, including sinking it. Sablin radioed back: "our actions carry an exclusively political character, and are not traitorous to the motherland. Anyone who tries to stop us is a traitor to the motherland." The flag of the upcoming communist revolution was raised on the ship.

After 8 days, the sailors lost hope, and freed the captain Putorin who shot Sablin's foot right on the bridge. Before being executed, Sablin wrote to his son: "Never be among people who criticise without action - they are hypocrites."

Discuss.
Image

"Bleh, i don't even know what i'm arguing for. What a stupid rant. Disregard what i wrote." - Loz
"Every time is gyros time" - Stalinista
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4390
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 10 Nov 2005, 04:08
Andropov had the better approach: getting into power and then kicking the crap out of the corrupt elite. Unfortunately he didn't have enough time. Thanks for the article though.

The Brezhnev regime (and the corruption that came with it) was too thoroughly entrenched and any revolutionary action would be bloody (it cannot be doubted that the army was at least partially corrupted as well, and would fight to help the regime preserve its power). The USSR's enemies would no doubt seize the opportunity to help to dismember the USSR at the same time. Any reform made to the defunct elements of the Soviet system (corruption, slowing economic performance, etc) would have to be made through slow internal change maintaining the guidelines of socialism as its path). The USSR had much to learn from their East German and Hungarian friends, who seemed to have largely solved problems of economic inefficiency and internal corruption. Andropov, in fact, was seriously considering implementing elements of Hungarian goulash socialism into the USSR's system, but again, time prevented him from making any serious achievements on this front.
"The thing about capitalism is that it sounds awful on paper and is horrendous in practice. Communism sounds wonderful on paper and when it was put into practice it was done pretty well for what they had to work with." -MiG
Soviet cogitations: 279
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 10 Dec 2004, 21:26
Komsomol
Post 11 Nov 2005, 15:01
We needed more good men like him.
I do not exploit man but I welcome man to exploit that which I'm working on for the greater good of all society. All work should be voluntary, never forced, never rewarded with materialistic things (such as money)and never denied.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 1702
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 21 Oct 2004, 21:15
Party Member
Post 11 Nov 2005, 22:27
Strange to me that you guys rally around Andropov. From what I've studied, it seems like he was just a Brezhnev crony who did fight corruption, yes, but he was just a fossil put in place because some in the Party weren't ready for Gorbachyov.
"Shake your chains to earth, like dew / Which in sleep had fall'n on you: / YE ARE MANY-THEY ARE FEW." - Percy Bysshe Shelley, 'The Masque of Anarchy'
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 4390
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 07 Oct 2004, 22:04
Ideology: Marxism-Leninism
Resident Soviet
Post 11 Nov 2005, 23:25
Andropov truly did put the USSR on the path to recovery from stagnation. His social and economic reforms were socialist minded, they strove for justice, they strove for improvement of peoples lives. At the same time, he was not a liberal, and he was not willing to make concessions that were not practical. He was not a Brezhnev like fossil because he did not think like the rest of them -he was sharp and reform and justice minded. His two mistakes:

1. He died too early
2. He promoted Gorbachev to his position of power (though to his credit Gorbachev showed no signs that he was not a genuine socialist, or an idiot)
Last edited by soviet78 on 30 Jan 2007, 10:22, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 2820
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 16 Feb 2005, 02:51
Party Bureaucrat
Post 12 Nov 2005, 01:09
I doubt that Andropov would have made much difference, another great reformer, Nikita Khrushchev, inlate fifties, his reforms significantly increased the agricultural production in the USSR, he provided housing for thousands, and he closed down gulags, but those reforms couldnot continue due to resistences from within the party leadership, and he had to resign in the end.
Image
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 1702
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 21 Oct 2004, 21:15
Party Member
Post 12 Nov 2005, 18:39
soviet78 wrote:
He truly did put the USSR on the path to recovery from stagnation.
If they were on the path, Gorby should have found zero traction for his ideas of destroying central planning. I admit that I was thinking more of Chernenko when I wrote my last comment, but the achievements of both were nil. If he had such great ideas, why didn't he try to find support for them during his career as a bureaucrat before becoming General Secretary (or whatever the post was - can't remember right now)?

Roy wrote:
increased the agricultural production
His Virgin Lands program was largely a failure. Most of this increased production was unfit for human consumption and instead was used to feed livestock.

Roy wrote:
he provided housing for thousands
May be true. But Stalin provided housing for millions...

Roy wrote:
he closed down gulags
He did not. Even though he claimed that Stalin was the devil and that everything bad about the Soviet Union was his fault, Kruschyov continued to make use of the "evil" gulag system. He had no qualms with drugging up charges and having his enemies locked away (or killed, like Beria).
"Shake your chains to earth, like dew / Which in sleep had fall'n on you: / YE ARE MANY-THEY ARE FEW." - Percy Bysshe Shelley, 'The Masque of Anarchy'
User avatar
Soviet cogitations: 2820
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 16 Feb 2005, 02:51
Party Bureaucrat
Post 13 Nov 2005, 00:56
Quote:
His Virgin Lands program was largely a failure. Most of this increased production was unfit for human consumption and instead was used to feed livestock.


==Not the virgin land programme, Khrushchev introduced market reforms which gave farmers more incentives, thus led to a boost in productivity.

Quote:
He did not. Even though he claimed that Stalin was the devil and that everything bad about the Soviet Union was his fault, Kruschyov continued to make use of the "evil" gulag system. He had no qualms with drugging up charges and having his enemies locked away (or killed, like Beria).


==Beria was the only one that actually got killed, rest of the leftovers from the Stalin era were merely sent to positions such as factory managers or diplomats, even people like Molotov admitted that life was much easier under Khrushchev.
Image
Soviet cogitations: 256
Defected to the U.S.S.R.: 29 Mar 2005, 04:51
Komsomol
Post 20 Nov 2005, 02:15
Wow... hadn't heard of this before now, and I truly admire him. It's a shame he wasn't successful, but even if he had got to Leningrad, I doubt he would have overthrown Brezhnev. At least he tried though. *salutes*
Image
Alternative Display:
Mobile view
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.