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Rudi Dutschke: revolutionary in the 60'ies

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Post 28 Oct 2006, 20:02
Early life
Dutschke was born in Schönefeld, (Kreis Jüterbog-Luckenwalde, Brandenburg), Germany. Rudi Dutschke attended school in Luckenwalde and graduated from the Gymnasium there, but because he refused to join the army of the German Democratic Republic and convinced many of his fellow students to refuse as well, he was prevented from attending university in the GDR. He fled to West Berlin in August, 1961 just one day before the Berlin Wall was built. He studied sociology at the Free University of Berlin under Richard Lowenthal and Klaus Meschkat where he became acquainted with alternative views of Marxism.

Dutschke joined the German SDS Sozialistischer Deutscher Studentenbund (which was not the same as the SDS in the USA, but quite similar in goals) in 1965 and from that time on the SDS became the center of the student movement, growing very rapidly and organizing demonstrations against the war in Vietnam. He married the American Gretchen Klotz (de) in 1966 and they had three children.


Political views
Influenced by critical theory, Rosa Luxemburg and critical Marxists, Dutschke developed a theory and code of practice of social change which did not propose a final Utopian form of society like the Utopian Socialists Claude Henri de Rouvroy, Comte de Saint-Simon and Charles Fourier, of whom Karl Marx was equally critical. Instead he believed that the direction, form and content of a more just and more democratic society should be developed in the process of revolutionizing society.

Dutschke also believed the transformation of Western societies should go hand in hand with Third World liberation movements and with democratization in communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. His socialism had strongly Christian roots. He called Jesus Christ the "greatest revolutionary", and at Easter 1963, he wrote in his diary, "Jesus is risen. The decisive revolution in world history has happened - a revolution of all-conquering love. If people would fully receive this revealed love into their own existence, into the reality of the 'now', then the logic of insanity could no longer continue."

Attempts have been made recently by conservatives with the goal of discrediting the movements of the sixties and seventies to stress the origin of German extremistism in the student movement. The death of Benno Ohnesorg in 1967 at the hands of German police, pushed some in the student movement toward increasingly extremist violence and the formation of the Red Army Faction. The violence against Dutschke further radicalised parts of the student movement into committing several bombings and murders. Dutschke rejected this direction and feared that it would end up causing the dissolution of the student movement, which indeed it did - along with other factors.


Shooting and later life
On April 11, 1968 Dutschke was shot in the head by Josef Bachmann, a young unskilled worker who was influenced by the massive propaganda campaign of the mass media owned by Axel Springer, especially the headline "Stop Dutschke now!" in the Bild-Zeitung. After the attempted assassination in 1968, Rudi Dutschke and his family went to the United Kingdom in the hope that he could recuperate there. He was accepted at Cambridge University to finish his degree in 1969, but in 1971 the Tory government under Edward Heath expelled him and his family as an "undesirable alien" who had engaged in "subversive activity", causing a political storm in London. They then moved to Aarhus, Denmark.

Rudi Dutschke reentered the German political scene after protests against the building of nuclear power plants activated a new movement in the mid-1970s. Dutschke recognized that this movement had a far broader base than the student movement had, and that its ecological orientation was going to define the progressive direction for the next generation.

He also began working with dissidents opposing the Communist governments in East Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia, including Robert Havemann, Wolf Biermann, Milan Horáček, Adam Michnik, Ota Å ik and more.

Rudi Dutschke recovered sufficiently to play an essential role in the 1980 formation of the Green Party of Germany by convincing the former student protesters (including Joschka Fischer) to join the Green movement. As a result in October, 1979 the Greens were able to reach the 5% limit required to obtain parliamentary seats in the Bremen provincial election.

Because of massive brain damage from the assassination attempt, Rudi Dutschke continued to suffer health problems. He died on 24 December 1979 in Aarhus, Denmark. He had an epileptic seizure while in the bathtub and drowned.

The earlier death of Benno Ohnesorg at the hands of German police, pushed some in the GSM toward increasingly extremist violence and the formation of the Red Army Faction. The violence against Dutschke further radicalised GSM members into committing several bombings and murders.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudi_Dutschke

What a man. Were people like Dutschke a positive evolution for the cause?
Post 31 Oct 2006, 19:59
Quote:
Were people like Dutschke a positive evolution for the cause?


Well, this is hard to answer. I think, he had some re-thinkable ideas. I don't share his christian attitude. And his conncetions with anti-communists like Biermann is, in my opion, counterrevolutionary. But he was one of the leading roles back in the 60s in Germany.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 21:53
He also opened the door for the RAF, I was more applying at that fact. I also know rightwinged guys, doesn't make me a fascist.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 21:56
He was a reactionary religious wannabe-revolutionary that didn't care for the workers and only had his christian pseudo-socialist utopia in mind.

He deserved the bullet he got.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 22:00
So if you are religious, you don't care for your people? That leaves out alot of revolutionary movements in S-America (marxist liberation theology).
Post 31 Oct 2006, 22:05
I didn't say that.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 22:08
So, if you don't mind his religious background, what is the precize problem?
Post 31 Oct 2006, 22:12
The problem is that he never did anything for the worker's movement nor wanted to change society by any actions.

He just preached his idea of an utopian christian socialist society without any ground to build it on unlike marxism which is a scientific theory based on hard facts and more or less accurate predictions.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 22:48
Quote:
The problem is that he never did anything for the worker's movement nor wanted to change society by any actions.


1. He was the leader of the student movement
2. He was shot because he was too activistic and thus too dangerous for the establishment.

Quote:
He just preached his idea of an utopian christian socialist society without any ground to build it on unlike marxism which is a scientific theory based on hard facts and more or less accurate predictions.

Again, you can be a marxist with a religious background. If not, there aren't many marxists left in S-America.
Post 31 Oct 2006, 23:40
Yeah, the Vlaams Belang are pretty much active as well, and too dangerous for the establishment
Post 31 Oct 2006, 23:42
Quote:
Yeah, the Vlaams Belang are pretty much active as well, and too dangerous for the establishment

They are not an active force in the public sphere and they are as a rightwinged popular party not a danger a priori.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 00:08
Just as many left-wing organisations. Not everything proclaiming to be left, and is active and a threat to the establishment, is always doing the working class a favour.

I've seen trots spoil entire generations of youth, just by shouting various phrases towards students.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 00:21
With the difference the establishment thought Dutschke had to be stopped, because he was too dangerous.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 17:20
Quote:

1. He was the leader of the student movement


The student movement never achieved anything as the only thing they did was hold protests all day long.
They were just as useless as the hippies in promoting the ideals of socialism and/or communism and free the working class from bourgoise oppression.

Quote:
2. He was shot because he was too activistic and thus too dangerous for the establishment.


Quote:
Josef Bachmann, a young unskilled worker


Only dangerous for the working class and the people in need.

Quote:
Again, you can be a marxist with a religious background. If not, there aren't many marxists left in S-America.


But those people base their actions on marxism AND religion and not ONLY religion.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 18:10
Quote:
The student movement never achieved anything as the only thing they did was hold protests all day long.
They were just as useless as the hippies in promoting the ideals of socialism and/or communism and free the working class from bourgoise oppression.

The communist parties are being command by petty-bourgeois leaders. So far that argument.

Quote:
But those people base their actions on marxism AND religion.

Like Dutschke.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 20:57
Quote:
The communist parties are being command by petty-bourgeois leaders. So far that argument.


Petty-bourgeois in your revisionist mind perhaps.

Quote:
Like Dutschke.


Post 01 Nov 2006, 21:07
Quote:
Petty-bourgeois in your revisionist mind perhaps.

Sociological background of communist members -> M. Fennema - Communist parties in Western Europe.

Enjoy reading.

Quote:

What an argument.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 21:14
Quote:
What an argument.


Dutschke:
Quote:
Ich bin ein Sozialist, der in der christlichen Tradition steht. Ich bin stolz auf diese Tradition. Ich sehe Christentum als spezifischen Ausdruck der Hoffnungen und Träume der Menschheit.


Translation:
Quote:
I'm a socialist who stays true to the christian tradition. I'm proud of this tradition. I see christianity as a specific expression of the hopes and dreams of humanity.


Sounds like a real marxist...

Unlike almost every single german marxist he called for german reunification and we all know to where this lead.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 21:18
Quote:
Ich bin ein Sozialist

Enough said.

Quote:
Sounds like a real marxist...

Like I stated before, liberation theologists are marxists too.

Quote:
Unlike almost every single german marxist he called for german reunification and we all know to where this lead.

Bertolt Brecht doesn't equal the whole marxist movement.
Post 01 Nov 2006, 21:30
Quote:
Enough said.


Socialism =/= Marxism

In fact he considered himself a christian democratic socialist in his youth and the end of his life.

Quote:
Bertolt Brecht doesn't equal the whole marxist movement.


No but every single german marxist party and the SED do.
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