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Prices in USSR in 60s or 70s?

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Post 03 Nov 2011, 04:35
Bought a bit of soviet era money as its fun to have. Now, my question is, does anyone have a reasonably accurate listing of what typical things cost in the USSR in the 60s or 70s ? Stuff like food, a theater ticket, the fee for having an apartment and so on.

Typical wages would be nice as well, say for a clerical worker and for a factory worker.


Thank you in advance
Loz
Post 07 Nov 2011, 01:59
A Google search brought up this site which lists prices for many goods in the 1976-1986 period,so this should give you an approximate insight into this matter.Use G.Translate.
http://visualweb.ru/cccp_old_prices/

As for the wages,according to this blog post (don't know how realible the information is though) the average wage was some 200 rubles,but here are more details:
http://origen-72.livejournal.com/52453.html

Hope this helps
Post 07 Nov 2011, 04:17
Rent for a 1 room apartment 12 rubles.
10-20 rubles for kindergarden.

1 ruble for a decent dinner.


We're getting hosed today
Post 07 Nov 2011, 04:22
Kinda makes one wonder why they didn't just abolish money if everybody could afford everything anyways... that would have been a step towards communism for once, not to mention that it would have simplified the economy (and therefore helped with bureaucracy issues) a lot.
Post 07 Nov 2011, 04:36
Mabool wrote:
Kinda makes one wonder why they didn't just abolish money if everybody could afford everything anyways... that would have been a step towards communism for once, not to mention that it would have simplified the economy (and therefore helped with bureaucracy issues) a lot.


Possibly to control demand?

Tradition?

Certainly would have been simpler in a lot of ways, and would have made black marketeering more difficult.
Post 07 Nov 2011, 05:58
runequester wrote:
Possibly to control demand?


Okay, but what about at least giving stuff like food and apartments away for free? Of these commodities, there was definitely enough there for everybody and it would have been a move of sheer awesomeness, because this would have given the ML thesis of socialism developing into communism at least a bit of credibility.

The fact that this was not done - or that in fact no kind of transition to communism was ever attempted in the orthodox ML states - kinda proves how, after Stalin at the very least, ML as a ruling ideology - indeed, as an ideology of rule - was nothing but a big fat lie. Even Mao was better than this.

Quote:
Tradition?


Is the antithesis to revolution.

Quote:
Certainly would have been simpler in a lot of ways, and would have made black marketeering more difficult.


Would have made any kind of "marketeering" more difficult, which is the point of communism tbh.
Loz
Post 07 Nov 2011, 06:15
But shouldn't we consider the fact that the USSR was,if not short of,but also not in a situation where it had the abundance of food either.I mean even grain had to be imported since the 60s.
If the food were indeed free,how would you control people from not taking more than necessary (or more than what what would be optimal ) without introducing a rations system which,granted,wouldn't have been very popular and would also serve as a rather bad "PR" for a superpower in times of peace

Hell,in the DDR bread was very cheap and some farmers resorted to buying it for pig-food! Had it been free,i assume,it would have been even worse.
Post 07 Nov 2011, 18:02
Money could not be abolished because it provided a measure of assurance against freeloaders. Sure the state could (and did) intervene to crack down on able people who didn't work, but the state is not an all-seeing, all knowing force. While financial pressure should not be the main driving force to existence and activity as it is in a capitalist economy, it should still play some role, lest someone choose that their career is to be an aspiring musician and philosopher living in their parents' flat.

runequester wrote:
Certainly would have been simpler in a lot of ways, and would have made black marketeering more difficult.


Black marketeering in the USSR was a two part problem. The first was that of corruption at the local distributive level (i.e. the store), where people who worked at the store could conceal existing product and sell it under the table. The second was that of the plan's inability to account for all needs. Here at the high level this was taken care of near legally by party bureaucrats who would work in regions and factories and 'grease the wheels' of production and transport by calling their colleagues and working out ways to get enough supplies, make things, and move the finished products to their destinations. Occasionally this was done with small payments, like a nice luxury food basket or some hard to get trinket. Foreign goods which were always in short supply, together with those goods the plan simply didn't account for, were black market territory, since their importation and/or distribution were officially considered against the interests of the state (though in reality most of this activity was tolerated since it satisfied a large portion of demand for these hard-to-find goods). Having said all that, I don't know how eliminating money would solve the problem.

Mabool wrote:
The fact that this was not done - or that in fact no kind of transition to communism was ever attempted in the orthodox ML states - kinda proves how, after Stalin at the very least, ML as a ruling ideology - indeed, as an ideology of rule - was nothing but a big fat lie.


I don't think it proves that. The trajectory of ML states' development determined to an extent what was possible for them to attempt. I think that if the problems in the existing system had been tackled more aggressively (like the causes and effects of corruption), the country would be able to carry out experiments like the elimination of money with more confidence and more prospects for success. Mao's commune experiments which you cite may have been 'correct' ideologically, but they lead the country to economic turmoil, famine and industrial underdevelopment.


Loz wrote:
But shouldn't we consider the fact that the USSR was,if not short of,but also not in a situation where it had the abundance of food either.I mean even grain had to be imported since the 60s...Hell,in the DDR bread was very cheap and some farmers resorted to buying it for pig-food! Had it been free,i assume,it would have been even worse.


Bread was cheap in the USSR too. There were even campaigns against old ladies buying fresh bread to feed to the birds in parks. As to Soviet grain imports, these were of feed grain to be fed to animals to increase the country's meat supplies. The USSR actually produced a surplus of grain, exporting food grade at the same time as it was importing feed grade.
Post 04 Jan 2012, 05:01
runequester wrote:
Rent for a 1 room apartment 12 rubles.
10-20 rubles for kindergarden.

1 ruble for a decent dinner.


We're getting hosed today

And the minimum / average salary?
Post 04 Jan 2012, 05:42
judging from that page between 120 and 200, but someone can correct me if I am interpreting information wrong
Pug
Post 05 Jan 2012, 23:31
runequester wrote:
Rent for a 1 room apartment 12 rubles.
10-20 rubles for kindergarden.

1 ruble for a decent dinner.


You should note, that the grant for students was about 40 roubles per month at the military-relates univercities. And somthing like 35 at ordinary ones.

ckkomel wrote:
And the minimum / average salary?


Average salary - 100-120 roubles for engineer
300 for worker-class (what a paradox)
200-400 for military officiers
Post 06 Jan 2012, 15:14
Thank you.

So was this grant what a student was paid while studying?

I assume students got food at school?
Pug
Post 10 Jan 2012, 17:40
runequester wrote:
So was this grant what a student was paid while studying?

You shoud have an average mark 4 (C)or higher to get the grant.

runequester wrote:
I assume students got food at school?

Yes, as far I know.
Post 10 Jan 2012, 17:56
oh, that brings up another question, but maybe thats for another thread.

Thanks though!
Loz
Post 31 May 2012, 09:19
Quote:
Applying the principles of the psychology on greed, the SOCIALIST MAN was not discriminate of how prices or how goods are sold on the market. Infatuated with collective consciousness, the socialist man consumes each product with utmost satisfaction. His subtle reaction to the law of socialist economics had been always positive, never pessimistic. Always optimistic.

Keep on trolling.

Quote:
Besides how can a socialist country like the USSR surpass the leading hegemonic imperialist country like the USA in the manufacture of tractors and the like like agricultural implements which took Third World countries like India, Pakistan, Philippines and Indonesia to manufacture and be self-sufficient in it.

Actually by 1960s the USSR overtook the US in the production of tractors.
Post 31 May 2012, 16:31
I deleted the reported post. We don't need that kind of sarcastic bullcrap here. Please continue to report any future trolling and baiting in future.
Post 03 Jun 2012, 06:23
Quote:
Black marketeering in the USSR was a two part problem. The first was that of corruption at the local distributive level (i.e. the store), where people who worked at the store could conceal existing product and sell it under the table. The second was that of the plan's inability to account for all needs. Here at the high level this was taken care of near legally by party bureaucrats who would work in regions and factories and 'grease the wheels' of production and transport by calling their colleagues and working out ways to get enough supplies, make things, and move the finished products to their destinations. Occasionally this was done with small payments, like a nice luxury food basket or some hard to get trinket. Foreign goods which were always in short supply, together with those goods the plan simply didn't account for, were black market territory, since their importation and/or distribution were officially considered against the interests of the state (though in reality most of this activity was tolerated since it satisfied a large portion of demand for these hard-to-find goods). Having said all that, I don't know how eliminating money would solve the problem.


Thanks Soviet78, almost every analysis of the shortcomings of the soviet economic system by accredited people, many self-proclaimed communist. I can't find the exact video, but Kurginyan's political analysis worked along the lines stated in the quote.

This is another element that supports market socialism. Imagine if the activity on the black market had been regulated and taxed, how much more beneficial for the people would that have been. The state could have encouraged the expansion of cooperatives to produce commodities for which the plan didn't account for. Again just saying it might be more beneficial to retain a fsome sort of market.
Post 06 Oct 2012, 06:48
ckkomel wrote:
Average salary - 100-120 roubles for engineer
300 for worker-class (what a paradox)
200-400 for military officiers

The worker class was paid more than engineers? That's kind of stupid in my opinion. Engineering is one of the most important professions.
Pug
Post 07 Oct 2012, 15:19
>>The worker class was paid more than engineers
yes

>>That's kind of stupid in my opinion
eeh
that's long and sad story
Post 10 Oct 2012, 14:57
That pay for engineers does not sound right, I will cite a famous example, the two Tupolevs.

Aviation Engineers
Showered with gifts by the state (Cars, for example)
Designed Aircraft critical to National Prestige, Transportation, and Defense

I highly doubt their salary was only 150rub, perhaps BASE salary was 150rub, with the potential for benefits as you prove yourself.
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