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Post 15 Oct 2010, 05:48
So, IF people bought jeans on the black market, did the authorities question them: "Whom did you get these from?!?!"

Or did it not matter, or what?
Loz
Post 15 Oct 2010, 21:04
From what i know no one would bother you because of your jeans.
It's not like the state wasn't aware of the black market-it was tolerated.
Post 15 Oct 2010, 22:07
Yeah, no one would bother you. Soviet textile plants also made jeans, although they were less sought after than Western brands by hip youngsters. And besides, there was nothing illegal about bringing home Western jeans if you went on vacation/business to a Western country, or negotiating with a Western tourist for his Levis.
Post 16 Oct 2010, 03:12
Jeans are illegal in North Korea but I don't know about the laws from any of the other former socialist states.
Post 16 Oct 2010, 08:05
Red Brigade wrote:
Jeans are illegal in North Korea but I don't know about the laws from any of the other former socialist states.

Are you serious? Are denim pants really illegal in DPRK? Or is that some crazy fallacy of Oblisk's (Jeans are a symbol of America, so all Communists should boycott them)?
Post 16 Oct 2010, 22:27
Quote:
Are you serious? Are denim pants really illegal in DPRK?

I think so I read it on wiki but it could be wrong.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let%27s_tr ... _lifestyle

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki?search=Jeans
Post 16 Oct 2010, 23:22
Wiki wrote:
In the North Korean capital city of Pyongyang, Western news articles reported that a hidden camera was placed to catch citizens with improper hairstyles. This was part of a television programme broadcast at the same time as Let's Trim Our Hair in Accordance with the Socialist Lifestyle. The offenders would then be interviewed by the presenter and asked to explain themselves. Their name, address and workplace would be announced to deter others from being embarrassed and ostracized.[9] In some instances, a man's wife or workplace would also be criticized for not managing a man's appearance more along state guidelines. Social mores and standards were being molded to appease the Kim family.

I'm sorry, this is fragging retarded! Purely practical considerations are one thing (long hair, if not worn under a cap, might tend to get caught in industrial machinery), but "social mores and standards being modeled to appease the Kim family" smacks of straight up feudal tyranny. Have any of these mediaeval miscreants ever seen a fragging picture of Marx? And what the frag has hair got to do with any "Socialist Lifestyle"?
Loz
Post 16 Oct 2010, 23:26
Well i know that policemen in Yugoslavia sometimes took young people with long hair to the station for a forced haircut,though.
I heard similar stories about USSR too.
I guess long hair was associated with delinquency or "pro-western" attitudes.
Last edited by Loz on 18 Oct 2010, 17:08, edited 1 time in total.
Post 16 Oct 2010, 23:28
A forced haircut may seem incredibly intrusive and authoritarian to us, I have no idea how it's seen in the context of Korean culture. Also, "to appease the Kim family" is obviously Western bullshit. It's definitely not un-socialist, just weird. I like my short hair, so I don't really care.
Post 17 Oct 2010, 00:33
Quote:
Have any of these mediaeval miscreants ever seen a fragging picture of Marx?

They've seen pictures of Marx.
Image


Quote:
And what the frag has hair got to do with any "Socialist Lifestyle"?

To keep out western and capitalist influences.
Post 17 Feb 2013, 09:37
Quote:
And what the frag has hair got to do with any "Socialist Lifestyle"?
To keep out western and capitalist influences.


I'm sorry, that's idiotic. Have conversations, have meetings, discuss issues.

You know, they could even import Western critiques of fashion. It's not like we don't have our own people who think much of our nonsense is ridiculous.

This is conformity, not communism. Marx would have hated it. I'm sorry. Read what he has to say about barracks communism, levelling down, and anything which deemphasized the individual. He saw the development of the individual as a necessary dialectical stage, and from the perspective of a feudal Jante law, it most certainly is.
Post 17 Feb 2013, 21:15
Jeans being banned along with long hair on men seems a bit silly and I highly doubt this was something strongly enforced by any socialist nation.


If you watch the documentary (Vice Guide to North Korea), where a few liberal journalists take the guided tour of the DPRK, men and women alike can be seen wearing jeans, and if I'm not mistaken one of the tour guides himself had pretty shaggy hair.
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