Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Login ] [ Active ]

Were there benefits with joining the party?

POST REPLY
Log-in to remove advertisement.
Post 17 May 2010, 10:52
I'm not too sure if it's true, but I read once that in the USSR people who joined the party had better job oppotunities than those who didn't, etc.
Loz
Post 17 May 2010, 19:50
Yes.
Same in Yugoslavia and i believe any other socialist country.
Better job opportunities,bigger chances of getting promoted,all kinds of small privileges etc.
Post 18 May 2010, 05:00
http://www.economicexpert.com/2a/Commun ... :Union.htm
Members of the nomenklatura would enjoy special privileges such as shopping at well-stocked stores, have preference in obtaining housing and access to dachas and holiday resorts, being allowed to travel abroad, send their children to the best universities and obtain prestigious jobs for them. It became virtually impossible to join the Soviet ruling and managing elite without being a member of the Communist Party.
Post 19 May 2010, 14:35
Why didn't everyone join the party? what kind of tests were required?
Post 19 May 2010, 15:19
i think you could be expelled pretty easily if you didnt follow each and every rule closely.
Post 20 May 2010, 01:38
The question that immediately comes to mind is: how would we prevent this in the future?

I know that Lenin favored purges to rid the party of opportunists, but how do you ensure the efficiency and objectivity of purges, so that it doesn't turn into an instrument for getting rid of whistleblowers?
Post 01 Jul 2010, 07:44
Stasi generals and their families were awarded with the privilege of meandering through a state "shopping mall" where they had access to western goods not accessible to any average DDR citizen.

Of course people had benefits being party members.
Post 01 Jul 2010, 08:46
Being a member of the party did not automatically mean benefits and privileges. There were 20 million members of the CPSU in the 1980s. If it were that simple everyone would join and the whole system would collapse. However, as Order227 noted, it was virtually impossible to join the ruling and managing elite without being a party member. Still, the direct link between party membership and privilege is an artificial one created by anti-Soviet propagandists, and we must remember this to retort simplistic and ignorant arguments of this kind (which are surprisingly often made).
Loz
Post 01 Jul 2010, 12:15
Quote:
Still, the direct link between party membership and privilege is an artificial one created by anti-Soviet propagandists, and we must remember this to retort simplistic and ignorant arguments of this kind (which are surprisingly often made).

Can you explain that.I know that being a "simple" Party member didn't get you much in Yugoslavia(except for better chances at employment etc) but is it true that "higher party" members had their special stores?
Post 01 Jul 2010, 14:06
Special stores existed for a range of people, mostly among the elite of the country, be it party and state leaders, certain categories of the bureaucracy, certain categories of workers, etc. Also, certain industrial enterprises had their own stores (which sought to gain and retain workers through various incentives like well stocked stores). Also, having connections, either through personal endeavours or through being famous, could be virtually equivalent to having access to special stores in that you could attain almost anything.

What I'm trying to say is that benefits in the Soviet socialist system accrued to the country's elites, be they leaders, managers, workers, artists, etc., rather then simply to 'party members'. The hierarchical organization certainly wasn't perfect or entirely fair, and a lot of people that didn't deserve it ended up comprising this elite or otherwise having the necessary connections. I just want to focus the nature of the phenomenon and to debunk the 'party membership = benefits' soundbyte, which is extremely simplistic and commonly used as anti-Soviet propaganda. My grandfather was a life-long party member, and it never got him anything that he couldn't have got without being a member. The same was true for millions of others.
Post 02 Jul 2010, 21:17
praxicoide wrote:
The question that immediately comes to mind is: how would we prevent this in the future?


Remove automatic party privileges for higher party members and reward them on the effort they invest into society instead of being rewarded for patronage. This assumes that the leaders are not corrupt to fall into cronyism and nepotism.


praxicoide wrote:
I know that Lenin favored purges to rid the party of opportunists, but how do you ensure the efficiency and objectivity of purges, so that it doesn't turn into an instrument for getting rid of whistleblowers?


Test the revolutionary credentials of suspected opportunists by conducting a series of tests and if they fail then they must be demoted to the bottom of the party or expelled for life.
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.
[ Top ]