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Video games in the USSR.

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Post 13 Oct 2006, 21:37
What are some of the video games that came out of the U.S.S.R? Other than the very popular tetris.
Post 14 Oct 2006, 01:15
Soviet video games were pretty primative all the way to the collapse of the country. Personal video gaming was pretty much limited to this (very popular when I was young):

Image


-There were various variations in theme.

In arcades we had some clones of Western games and some of the East German clones of them. Games included Pong (with the little colour squares you had to break through), a type of battleship game (Soviet invented I believe, as I haven't been able to find it in the West), Pacman, car racing, shooting gallery, and others.
Post 14 Oct 2006, 02:17
I've read there were also home computers. I think the most populars were some clones of the british Sinlcair "Spectrum" and some russian development from that called "Scorpion 256". So I think they must have found a way to copy games for those computers, or programmed something similar.
Post 14 Oct 2006, 02:30
Oh, FISHING (i.e. Battleship). Something about trying to fill your partners boat with fish. Only the West could turn something so innocent into a game of death and destruction. But wasn't it a paper and pencil type game?
Post 14 Oct 2006, 02:42
Yes, it is fishing. This should be of some interest of someone.

Quote:
Soviet Board Games Repackaged by the Western Bourgeois

Justin Kahn

SOVIET GAME: “Fields”
(Repackaged in the West as “Monopoly”)

OBJECTIVE: To make it through the game without harming any one, while providing for your loved ones.

PLAY: Players take turns rolling dice and moving the corresponding number of squares. If you land on a Wheat Square and you are hungry than you may partake. If some one you care for is hungry than he or she may eat. If you and yours are satisfied you pass the dice on.

WESTERNIZATION: Parker Brothers took the basic concept, plowed the fields and encouraged massive construction despite the existence of not more than a handful of players. And so Monopoly was released.
-------------------------------------------------------------
SOVIET GAME: “Fishing”
(Repackaged in the West as “Battleship”)

OBJECTIVE: To encourage a feeling of brotherhood amongst comrades and sense of pride in the waters of the Fatherland.

PLAY: Each player sets his Boat somewhere on the board. Your opponent places Fish surrounding your boat. The winner is the boater who is able to place the maximum number of fish in the boat. The loser, who possess less fish, should yell, “Enjoy the Fish!” Players should take turns being the loser, so as to encourage both the strong sense of being provided for and a sense of humility.
WESTERNIZATION: Milton Bradley took the basic concept of “Fishing” partitioned off the board and loaded up each boat with enough firepower to destroy themselves a hundred times over. The loser is supposed to declare, “You sunk my battleship.”

-------------------------------------------------------------
SOVIET GAME: “Axis and Allies”
(Repackaged in the West as “Axis and Allies”)

OBJECTIVE: To capture enough enemy territory and be declared victor.
PLAY: Each country is given a turn to make economic and strategic decisions. A role of the dice determines the success of decisions. The map is rearranged based on the outcome.
WESTERNIZATION: Ditto.
-------------------------------------------------------------
SOVIET GAME: “Triage”
(Repackaged in the West as “Operation”)

OBJECTIVE: To be the first player to accept the loss of a patient.

PLAY: The only equipment is a board with a very, very unhealthy man on it. Players take turns deciding if this one person is worth the resources of the collective.

WESTERNIZATION: Encouraging a specialization on the part of the doctor and an unhealthy attachment to the individual in the form of a patient, Milton Bradley took the basic concept of ‘Triage’ and turned it into a game of skill, where the object is to save the patient.
-------------------------------------------------------------
SOVIET GAME: “Escape the Police!”
(Repackaged in the West as “Chutes and Ladders”)

OBJECTIVE: To escape the police and allow players to learn the highly arbitrary factors which will affect you and your loved ones, when trying to save your own skin.

PLAY: Each player spins the spinner and moves a corresponding number of squares. If you land on a trap door you must follow the trap to the square below. If you land on a square with an escape rope, you must climb to safety, even if it means leaving your friends behind. If you land on a square where there is neither trapdoor nor escape rope your turn is over. Unless you are able to rip the spinner away from one of the other players. The person who makes it to the last square--Freedom-- is the winner. The remaining players did not survive and are losers.

WESTERNIZATION: In an effort to further delay the age at which children become adults, Milton Bradley decided that kids age 4-7 aren’t ready to deal with life in a police state. Trap doors are replaced with ‘Chutes’ and escape ropes are replaced with ‘Ladders’, providing kids with a context to go up and down the board for no apparent reason. Way to go Milton Bradley.


Thank for you for the responses. I was hoping that their were some entertaining, unique and Soviet invented games for the computer (or consol).
Post 14 Oct 2006, 02:56
They had that type of cheesy video game in the country I grew up in too... man, what a trip down memory lane!
Post 14 Oct 2006, 03:13
Quote:
Oh, FISHING (i.e. Battleship). Something about trying to fill your partners boat with fish. Only the West could turn something so innocent into a game of death and destruction.


Well the computer battleship game I was talking about had you looking into a fake periscope, and then ships would come across the screen from one side to the other, and you would try to hit them.

Oh, and by the way adamruscan, the "Justin Khan" article you posted is obviously a joke. (you knew that right?) I remember the paper and pencil game Battleship from the USSR too, and it was called "морской бой" -literally "water combat"



As for computers, I forgot to mention them, but they were VERY rare. There was no 'Commodore 64' or equivalent in scale.
Mostly engineers got together and built their own computers.
Last edited by soviet78 on 14 Oct 2006, 06:59, edited 1 time in total.
Post 14 Oct 2006, 03:34
Lies!
Post 14 Oct 2006, 05:15
I've found some links regarding home computers on the USSR. It seems that they were very rare until 1988. Mostly clones of Spectrum and MSX.

Here are the links:
http://zx.interface1.net/ (see the clones section)
http://www.homecomputer.de/pages/f_easteurope.html
Post 11 Aug 2007, 04:02
We had a console called "Dendy", which was very popular, bit is just a Soviet copy of the Nintendo Entertainment System
Post 11 Aug 2007, 14:18
Quote:
SOVIET GAME: “Axis and Allies”
(Repackaged in the West as “Axis and Allies”)

OBJECTIVE: To capture enough enemy territory and be declared victor.
PLAY: Each country is given a turn to make economic and strategic decisions. A role of the dice determines the success of decisions. The map is rearranged based on the outcome.
WESTERNIZATION: Ditto.

Wow, so that's where that game came from. Maybe Bendeguz is actually a communist...
Post 12 Aug 2007, 18:16
Yeah, I saw a great article on Soviet arcade games a while ago. They looked fun, albeit a bit simple. But come on guys.. tetris. By 1989 it was probably the union's biggest export outside coal, vodka, and ak-47's.
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