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Schools in the USSR

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Post 03 Aug 2004, 04:45
In the USSR what age did you start school at and what age or grade did school end ? Was there military tranining in gym or a specal class for that ? IF you where good at something such as sports where you just kept in sports to develop your skills more rather then waste them on other things ?
Post 03 Aug 2004, 17:23
School consisted of 10 grades but after a certain grade you went to school on saturdays as well. You started school at the age of 7. The vacations however were longer than they are in America. The Russian school system was a lot better than the American.
Post 03 Aug 2004, 22:55
That's not hard. In the US you can just decide to 'home school' your kid and do it yourself.

...And who makes better teachers than reclusive religious parents?

-TIG
Post 06 Sep 2004, 03:38
Yes, Nevsky is correct.

Also, military training was obligatory for school children.

For example, every kid who finished school need to assemble and dissassemble AK-47 assault rifle in 30 seconds. They were given real AK-47, and each need to remember his AK-47 number. They also were trained to use NBC-protection (gas masks, etc), RPG launchers, stuff like that.


I've heard real story from one guy when he visited Western arms store, took AK-47, dissassembled and assembled it, taking only 30 seconds.

Seller: "Where did you learned it? Soviet Army? Marines? VDV Paratroopers? Spetsnaz?"

Russia: "No, Moscow state school number 35."




Soviet education was best in the world, especially in Maths, Physics, Biochemistry, Engineering and Military.
Post 13 Sep 2004, 05:39
I went to special math and science school.
Post 19 Oct 2004, 22:30
Languages were also taught better in Soviet schools. We had to learn more than simply asking directions to the post office.
I was Back in Belarus a week ago, and the education system is 'on it's arse'. Priorities have changed from looking to the future of the country to looking for a future out of the country.
Even worse in Poland. I visited a friend of mines English class in Nowa Sowzh and all they wanted to know about England was how easy is it to get a job, and what is the wage.
If a Belarussian can work in the UK then a Pole ought to be optimistic!
Post 20 Oct 2004, 01:33
What was the purpose of teaching foreign language in CCCP (unless you mean the languages of the soviet peoples)?

Languages are taught terribly in schools here. Students learn squat.
Post 27 Oct 2004, 22:43
As I understand it (from what my Russian language textbook says), Russian students universally studied other languages, often as early as the 2nd grade. English, German, and French were most common. Thorough knowledge of a foreign language was considered prestigious, in a sense. They prided themselves in being educated and worldly. There's a quote from someone, paraphrased, "If you only know one language, you're looking at the world through one eye."
Post 22 Dec 2004, 16:22
interrupt_00h wrote:
Yes, Nevsky is correct.
For example, every kid who finished school need to assemble and dissassemble AK-47 assault rifle in 30 seconds.

That was sad. Pure 100% militaristic nation
Post 22 Dec 2004, 18:27
Quote:
interrupt_00h wrote:
Yes, Nevsky is correct.
For example, every kid who finished school need to assemble and dissassemble AK-47 assault rifle in 30 seconds.

That was sad. Pure 100% militaristic nation

But the Cold War was going on. This was just to prepare the country for a possible war.
Post 23 Dec 2004, 05:50
Turhapuro wrote:
That was sad. Pure 100% militaristic nation

That is teaching kids respect for weapons. I'd bet there were virtually no deaths from playing with weapons in the Soviet Union than in, say, the United States.

Discipline helps build great nations. Look at the Spartans of Greece - same deal.
Post 25 Dec 2004, 20:34
GTctygeht wrote:
Turhapuro wrote:
That was sad. Pure 100% militaristic nation

That is teaching kids respect for weapons.

Totally bullshit. That is teaching kids to kill.

Quote:
I'd bet there were virtually no deaths from playing with weapons in the Soviet Union than in, say, the United States.

I think that is not because military teaching but because better gun control.

Quote:
Discipline helps build great nations. Look at the Spartans of Greece - same deal.

I really don't want to live in militaristic nation like Sparta or USSR. Life sucks there.
Post 25 Dec 2004, 21:08
Turhapuro wrote:
Totally bullshit. That is teaching kids to kill.


Yeah man. You know, holding Kalashnikov always makes me want to destroy something beautiful or kill something alive. Last time I was trying to disassemble Kalashnikov in thirty seconds I imagined that I was tearing human's body covered with blood instead of gun grease into pieces.

Now that I was trained to disassemble Kalashnikov I surely know how to kill people!


Turhapuro wrote:
I really don't want to live in militaristic nation like Sparta or USSR. Life sucks there.


Ever been to USSR? Or Sparta?
Post 26 Dec 2004, 04:49
Turhapuro wrote:
Totally bullshit. That is teaching kids to kill.


Perhaps I missed something somewhere, but knowing how to take a weapon apart doesn't seem like something that will help you kill people; unless, of course, having more parts to throw at people is really all that helpful.
Post 26 Dec 2004, 06:24
It's about as helpful as taking the gun apart and throwing the bullets at them instead.
Post 26 Dec 2004, 06:50
Classroom work often means reciting and being tested in a written form or orally by the teacher and sometimes evaluated by the teacher in front of the class. Criticism by the teacher in front of the class is frequent and accepted.

Russian children go to school at the age between 6 and 7. They attend school for 10 years and then finish it at 16 (or17). If one does not perform properly during the acadenic year and one's grades are below satisfactory, he or she can be forced to study the failed year again ('to be left for the second year' as it is said here in Russia). They usually spend all the ten years in one buildingas all the three schools are in the same building.

School years are divided into 3 sub-schools: primary, secondary and high. Primary is 4 years, secondary is 5 and high is 2. School starts on September 1 and remains in session till the end of May, with June being the month of exams.

The school year is comprised of 4 terms with vacations in between: one week in November, two weeks in January, one week in the end of March and almost 3 months in summer (except for the time when students are busy with their exams).

Some subjects are a must, some are optional. This is list of the normal classes tought at Russian schools:

* Russian Literature
* Russian Langauge
* Mathematics
* Algebra and Geometry (mostly studied in senior classes),
* Physics
* Chemistry
* Russian History
* World History
* Geography
* Biology
* Foreign Languages (English, German, French, or Spanish), usually one at a time
* Physical Educaion
* Cooking, Arts and Crafts (for girls)
* Manual Work (for boys)
* Art of Drawing
* Music
* Astronomy

Some scools may devote more attention to certain subjects. Then it is a Spanish, Literature or Math school, whatever the area of the major school interest is.

The normal class size is 20-30 students.The students are together from the 1st till the last grade. The primary school pupils have one teacher for all the subjects tought (reading, writing, mathematics etc). As so children do not have to adjust to every new teacher of a differnt subject.

The school day normally starts at 8 o'clock in morning and finishes at 1 or 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Students come to school 5 days a week, some study on Saturdays.

The period lasts 40-45 minutes with a 5 or 15 minute break in between. Students have four classes a day in the primary school, five or six in the secondary, six or seven if it is the senior high school.

Students are normally graded on the scale from 2 to 5 , with "5" being the top grade. Each student has his or her personal book of records of academic achievments, or the "diary" (the word, a lot of students and teachers would call it), where the teacher would record the grades for the student after a test or an oral report.

Unless you went to school in Russia then don't post things you have not experienced. I went to school in St. Petersburg from 75 till 79 before my Father got moved to a new position out of the Country. I never had to take apart any guns. I did get taught about the lies of the West and how they would someday try to rule the World. Imagine that huh.
Post 12 Jan 2005, 18:07
Just to throw my towel in:

I went to school in Bulgaria in the mid 90s, and according to my dad who monitored it quite closely it was not far off that the communist model:
Maths was still taught to a VERY high standard, languages too.

During the socialist days, Bulgarians started leanring Russian from grade 1 and usually another language at grade 4-5. The mark system was 2 to 6 (6 being the highest). 1 was reserved for cheating.

The Bulgarian educational system was based on the East German one which differed a little from the Soviet one. But I daresay that all Warsaw Pact countries' schools had a very similiar educational systems with excellent tuition in Maths and technological subjects such as Physics, as well as high standards in languages and sport.

A proof of this? Soviet, Bulgarian and undoubtedly other Warsaw Pact students always occupied the top places in international maths competetions!
Post 21 Feb 2005, 22:28
True. Both of my parents were born and grew up in Hungary. For them, it was not a matter of wether or not you would go the University, but which university. When they both emigrated to Australia in 88, all they had was 1 suitcase full of clothes, 1 full of plates, the clothes on there backs and limited English. Now we live in a large house, I go to an excellent school and though we will have to be paying the Banks a mortgage for the next 40 years, and we are not per say, ‘rich’ we don’t have to worry about money. They didn’t make life so easy that people would start getting lazy. They taught them to have intelligence and determination (Hungarian doctors are still the most sought after medical staff in Europe; they can get a job anywhere!)
Post 22 Feb 2005, 01:26
"I've heard real story from one guy when he visited Western arms store, took AK-47, dissassembled and assembled it, taking only 30 seconds"

Grin - I'm doing OK then? 20 seconds - in the dark
OK, I didn't break down the bolt.... that requires a pin punch. I'm working on it
Post 18 Dec 2005, 19:33
My 2 kopeks.

They WERE teaching to take apart AK-74 (not AK-47, those are discontinued). There was a class called Basic Military Training. But only for grades 9 and 10. Teacher would usually be a retired military officer. We have never shot from Kalash in school. We did not even have bullets for that.
But we did shoot from small-caliber rifle from laying position. Our school had 25-meter shooting range in the basement. I remember hitting somewhat 40-42 out of 50. Weapons were always locked up and shooting incidents were very-very rare.

As for the languages. I would not say they were teaching them that well. What can you learn from a teacher who has never been abroad, never spoken to a native speaker and learnt foreign language from the same textbook you did?
So speaking and understanding live speach was basically at zero level.
But reading and writing was tought quite well. After graduating people were supposed to read foreign articles in their professional field. But in reality not many of them did. On a job application to question 'Foreign languages' most common answer would be 'I read and translate with dictionary'.
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