Soviet-Empire.com U.S.S.R. and communism historical discussion.
[ Login ] [ Active ]

Do you support Anti-sweatshop campaigns?

POST REPLY
Log-in to remove advertisement.

Do you support Anti-sweatshop campaigns?

Yes
20
87%
No
2
9%
Other
1
4%
 
Total votes : 23
Loz
Post 20 Jun 2012, 08:06
What do you think of anti-sweatshop campaigns and initiatives?

Quote:
Anti-Sweatshop refers to campaigning movements to improve the conditions of workers in Sweatshops, i.e. manufacturing places characterized by low wages, poor working conditions and often child labor. It started in the 19th century in some industrialized countries: USA, Australia and the UK to improve the conditions of workers in those countries.[1]

In the late 20th century, with the advent of globalization, movements were formed to protest the exploitation of workers in poorer countries by companies based in wealthy countries. Noam Chomsky said in The Nation that the anti-sweatshop movement is in some ways, he said, "like the antiapartheid movement, except that in this case it's striking at the core of the relations of exploitation. It's another example of how different constituencies are working together."[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweatshop

On pro and anti-sweatshop arguments:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweatshop# ... sweatshops
Post 21 Jun 2012, 07:05
Yes. I was a member of United Students Against Sweatshops in college. More or less it was international union recgoniztion or contact agreements, Never really dealt with most of the liberal BS sterotypes about the movement.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 17:56
I'd be extremely curious who on here was in favour of sweatshops. Terrible, exploitative labour conditions was the birth of the workers rights and socialist movements.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 18:37
The anti-sweatshop movement basically focuses on a single symptom of the world imperialist system, and often doesn't call into question capitalism itself. I was involved in a group in college, and it completely remained within a bourgeois liberal framework, attempting to achieve "capitalism with a human face" through boycotts and conscientious consumerism.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 18:58
khlib wrote:
The anti-sweatshop movement basically focuses on a single symptom of the world imperialist system, and often doesn't call into question capitalism itself. I was involved in a group in college, and it completely remained within a bourgeois liberal framework, attempting to achieve "capitalism with a human face" through boycotts and conscientious consumerism.


Would you oppose it on those grounds?
Post 21 Jun 2012, 19:17
I don't know what you mean by "oppose it." I personally wouldn't dedicate any more time or energy to the movement, as I think leftist parties share the same overall goals but go about achieving them in more realistic ways. As long as there is a global capitalist system, cheap labor will be exploited. A group of wealthy students vowing to wear only American Apparel clothes is not going to change anything.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 19:30
They won't, but people radicalise in different ways.

As a communist, you should be connecting the links together. If Joe understands that sweatshop labour is wrong, lead him to understand why it has been an inevitability wherever capitalist production exists.



The failure to connect things people can see and feel immediately with larger concepts is the failure of the political left.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 22:27
Yes, just because the West went through this period in the 19th Century doesn't mean that the poor of the developing nations should have to be exploited so that we are clothed. Obviously this movement should go further than merely ending sweatshops and there should be alternative production methods to the ones we have now.

Liberals tend to favour sweatshops as they believe that the conditions are better than subsistence farming.
Post 21 Jun 2012, 23:02
Yes

Obviously no-one likes the horrible conditions, long hours and low pay, etc. However, we should also remember that these horrible conditions are exactly what organised labour forms out of. Thus we have to look towards sweatshops as producing an organised proletariat. They are sadly a necessity in the developing world (althought that doesn't mean the third world workers should not be trying to end them).

Quote:
Liberals tend to favour sweatshops as they believe that the conditions are better than subsistence farming.


People working in sweatshops is more progressive than people working as subsistence farmers.
Post 22 Jun 2012, 09:13
Yes, of course, without falling into economicism.

...or into the joke that is "Star Wars: the environmentalist version" (http://submedia.tv/endciv/2009/09/10/star-wars/)
Post 23 Jun 2012, 06:01
khlib wrote:
The anti-sweatshop movement basically focuses on a single symptom of the world imperialist system, and often doesn't call into question capitalism itself. I was involved in a group in college, and it completely remained within a bourgeois liberal framework, attempting to achieve "capitalism with a human face" through boycotts and conscientious consumerism.


USAS wrote: We define “sweatshop” broadly and consider all struggles against the daily abuses of the global economic system to be a struggle against sweatshops. We envision a world in which society and human relationships are organized cooperatively, not competitively. We struggle towards a world in which all people live in freedom from oppression, in which people are valued as whole human beings rather than exploited in a quest for productivity and profits.

khlib wrote:
A group of wealthy students vowing to wear only American Apparel clothes is not going to change anything.


Fair trade =/= the anti-sweatshop movement. Fair trade is paternalistic wealthly folks feeling sorry for bad conditions of working people and think that buying from "good" companies makes a difference; whereas, the anti-sweatshop movement focuses on empowering students and workers. The IWW has some good articles attacking Starbucks fair trade for example.

gRed Britain wrote:
People working in sweatshops is more progressive than people working as subsistence farmers.


Many nations that are effected by sweatshops (in the past two decades) had industry prior to sweatshops (export processing zones in many cases). Furthermore the majority of workers in apparel sweatshops are women. iirc the ILO states someone like 90% of apparel sweatshop workers are young women. Usually not the typical "breadwinners."
More Forums: The History Forum. The UK Politics Forum.
© 2000- Soviet-Empire.com. Privacy.
cron
[ Top ]